eWoodShop - Mission Bar Stool - project start?

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Moving off a far distant, furthermost back burner, and toward a back burner closer to the front, is a personal bar stool project:
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopMissionBarStool #
Although buying project wood is usually a sure sign that a project will be started in earnest, and finished (I have never not finished a project started), there is only enough wood in the photo to make the legs for two, of four anticipated, bar stools (on this visit there was not enough _suitable_ white oak, in stock at this particular hardwood lumber supplier, to purchase any more than what you see here).
With some species of domestic lumber becoming harder to find, and their high prices these days, it is damned nigh impossible to compete with "factory made" tables and chairs ... AAMOF, it is highly probable that one would save money by going to Stickley, or The Amish Craftsman, and just buying the damned things ... that is if some of us weren't so stubborn.
What the hell, you only live once ...
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On 10/27/2012 2:34 PM, Swingman wrote:

Cool design!
If it makes you feel any better, I looked pretty closely at some Mission style Stickley furniture at Lewis Shanks Furniture 6~7 years ago and while it looks like pretty from the "sell side" the back sides of the chests had a MUCH less than desirable look. Inside the drawers were not impressive either.
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If you'll be trick or treating in my neighborhood, I could unload some white oak on you. I've never worked with WO and, 2 yrs ago, I inherited quite a bit of it.... it's just stacked there waiting for a/someone's project to come along. Your bar stools look like a neat project.
Yesterday, I went out to the farm and started tearing down an old cypress house. Got the roof off. The roof rafters seems to have once been hand hewn beams, later sawn into rafters. The cross boards, for attaching the original wooden shingles, are split boards, rather than sawn. Unusual lumber and should make for some nice rustic pieces. Will go back out this morning to salvage more - ceiling joists, wall boards (1X stock) and hopefully flooring and floor joists. Tommorrow (Monday), the area will be dozed for expanding the rice fields, so we'll need to work fast, today.
On a sad note: The neighboring farmer, while harvesting his cotton, his cotton picker exploded (several explosions) and caught fire. Never like to see a neighbor have those kinds of accidents. Initial, I wasn't aware of the problem, a tree line was between us, so not sure if the driver was injured.
Sonny
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"Sonny" wrote:
If you'll be trick or treating in my neighborhood, I could unload some white oak on you. I've never worked with WO and, 2 yrs ago, I inherited quite a bit of it.... it's just stacked there waiting for a/someone's project to come along. Your bar stools look like a neat project. ----------------------------------------------------------------- Machine a piece of that white oak, especially quarter sawn, then apply some boiled linseed oil cut with some turps.
You can also use mineral spirits, I just like the smell of turps.
Wait a couple of days before rubbing out.
Might surprize yourself.
Lew
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On 10/31/2012 12:35 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

Amazing what just sanding and applying shellac will do with QS oak of any kind ... look at the _insides_ of these QS red oak drawer sides, nothing but a shellac topocoat:
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopArtsCraftsSofaTable#5801130901725011202
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Pretty! Quite yellow, too. Did you use lemon shellac? I bought blonde bug spit for my own use (preferring clearcoats on everything), but for an A&C piece, I'd probably have selected a garnet shellac to blend with the outer color. "Porque you no stain the drawer pieces, too, seor?" asked the cat.
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Amber ... Right outta the Binsser can, cut to 1 1/2lb.
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I'll have to try some BLO and shellac on a sample piece of white oak.
Last (red) oak project I did was probably 20-25 yrs ago, this chair http://www.flickr.com/photos/43836144@N04/4035435456/in/photostream I don't recall what I put on it. This chair, at Mom's house, is a favorite at the family reunions.
Sonny
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Gorgeous!
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wrote:

Why are the armrests shaped differently, Sonny?
-- It is easier to fool people than it is to convince people that they have been fooled. --Mark Twain
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On Wednesday, October 31, 2012 7:32:33 PM UTC-6, Larry Jaques wrote:

They are both the same, tilted about 15 or so. I experimented with this rocker, for Mom's large front porch. I always liked sitting out there, relaxing. I was trying this design. It works great, except when you have a cup of coffee or other drink. You can't simply rest the cup on the arm, as with a straight armrest. Folks are impressed with the look and the seating is really comfortable, but the armrest function is lacking because of the tilt. You have to "guard" any drink you have. I do have another chair, in the works, and these armrests will not be tilted.
BTW, the seat design is very similar to a porch swing seat, it just has "legs" added to it. And this is also the basic seat design of the child's loveseat rockers I've made for school, etc. fund raisers.
Sonny
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wrote:

I guess the angle of the shot prevents me from seeing the notch on the right arm you have on the left arm. But it looked like the left had a circular and end while the right had a convex curved oval end. Bad perspective from a single shot, I guess.

sitting out there, relaxing. I was trying this design. It works great, except when you have a cup of coffee or other drink. You can't simply rest the cup on the arm, as with a straight armrest. Folks are impressed with the look and the seating is really comfortable, but the armrest function is lacking because of the tilt. You have to "guard" any drink you have. I do have another chair, in the works, and these armrests will not be tilted. Hey, a drink holder bolted to the bottom of either armrest would be just the ticket, I'd think.

added to it. And this is also the basic seat design of the child's loveseat rockers I've made for school, etc. fund raisers. It's a nice design. How comfy is it?
-- It is easier to fool people than it is to convince people that they have been fooled. --Mark Twain
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On Wednesday, October 31, 2012 8:10:48 PM UTC-6, Larry Jaques wrote:

arm you have on the left arm. But it looked like the left had a circular and end while the right had a convex curved oval end. Not sure what notch you're speaking of, but I'll take detail pics of the whole chair next time I visit, possibly today, more likely tommorrow.
Sonny
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Thassum yella shit, Maynard. But you don't have to worry, do you? You're color-blonde. <g>
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https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopMissionBarStool#5817456043527134674
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Hi Karl. Can you tell me how you bent this wood? Thanks
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On 12/2/2012 8:03 PM, Dave wrote:

Not bent, band saw and pattern bit on a router table:
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopMissionBarStool#5807765305303561778
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopMissionBarStool#5809252927056371682
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopArtsCraftsChairReproduction2006#5651146102887739186
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Well, they give the illusion of being bent. Nice work!
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On 12/2/2012 9:03 PM, Dave wrote:

chamfers on the tablesaw? how'd you get the bent leg section out of the way, raise the leg off the top, or did you cut w/the leg vertical?
You and Leon and your festools... do you get a kickback from Festool for showing all your festools????? Got any spares to prove to me how good they are???? :-)
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On 12/3/2012 4:08 PM, tiredofspam wrote:

Used one of the complementary angle cutoffs from one of the legs, and a piece of plywood, to make a miter saw jig:
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopJigsFixturesMethods#5817861841910217602
The jig is clamped to the table of a miter saw (Makita LS1013), and against the fence to make two of the chamfer/bevels (one cut on each side of the jig, on the dogleg faces).
1. Setup the jig up with the blade 45 right, cut one side/face of all the legs.
2 Swing the blade to 45 left, reposition the jig, and cut the opposite side/face of all the legs.
3 & 4 The remaining two chamfer/bevels on each leg, those on the faces without the dogleg, can actually be made on the miter saw table, and against the fence, with the blade in either 45 orientation, and without a jig.

Couple of reasons, so happens they're in constant use, so they simply show up in photo backgrounds ... and it's also a function of a small shop (306 SF). :)
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