Every turn your bench grinder on its end?


Hi,
I was thinking that a bench grinder does not have to produce a hollow grind. You would get a flat bevel if you make the axle of the bench grinder vertical but do not change your tool rest position and still grind on the circumfrence of the wheel. The cutting edge of the blade will be perpendicular to the grinder axle. (hard to picture?) It might be easier to make a vertical tool rest. I suppose you would have to be careful to even out the wheel wear. Sure you could use a belt sander or a platter sharpener. I was just wondering if anyone has ever heard of this arrangement being used successfully.
Thanks, Peter
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On 3 May 2005 22:20:47 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Go ahead and try it out, but when you're grinding on the circumference of the wheel, *something* is going to end up curved, and I suspect you won't like the result nearly so much as a hollow grind. Makes more sense to use a belt sander or to get one of those diamond wheels that are designed to be used on the "side" (usually they're mounted differently, which is why that is in quotes) if you're seriously trying to avoid a hollow grind. Or, you could just be like any other clod without a special hollow-grind-less power sharpener, and use a stone or some sandpaper stuck to a bit of glass. :)
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Not I. I don't think the stones are built up properly for that kind of operation.
There are flat hones out there, and sandpaper for the contour, so if you want to go hollowless, go there.
With modern stones, I don't think hollow grinds are necessary, though some still consider them desirable. I always get a kick out of the turners who tout the superiority of an 8" over a 6" (or vice-versa) grinder based on the depth of the hollow produced over < 1/4" chord.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com writes:

One of the lathe books, by Eric Conover, suggests using the side of the wheel for sharpening a skew - says the Oneway skew attachment doesn't set the angle right.
The danger is that as the wheel gets worn, you weaken the MIDDLE of the wheel, encouraging the outer rim to break off.
Perhaps a wet wheel grinder is the way to go. Woodcraft has one on sale this month for about $75.
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AIR, grinder wheels say right on the label not to grind on the side. Wilson
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

The bearings of the grinders are not likely designed to allow for much lateral thrust; strictly a perpendicular load with only 'some' allowance for lateral thrust. When changing the load-bearing characteristic in such a dramatic fashion, I would strongly suggest NOT to venture into that uncertainty. All other cautions, such as wearing the stones in a hazardous way, mentioned herein, are also very valid, IMHO.
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Peter,
Typical grinding wheels are not designed for grinding on the side and most I've seen, have a warning label attached. We probably all have done it at one time or another but that still doesn't make it a good practice. Years ago, I had a wheel disintegrate on me while dressing it, and it's not a fun thing. Luckily I had on a leather apron, face shield and gloves but still had to change my shorts.
An idea you may want to try is to make an MDF disk of the size to fit your grinder (6" or 8") and then attach an adhesive sanding disk to it. Scary Sharp on steroids.... I've done this for my wet/dry sharpening system when I couldn't get the wheel grit I wanted and it works great using 8" disks. For wet/dry papers, super fine grits, I cut them from a 8"x10"sheet and spray the back with some 3M #77 spray on glue and attach them to the MDF wheel. I have since replaced the MDF disk with a 8" metal disk (Sears 8" sanding plate) since the MDF didn't hold up well after using water with it. Thought I had it sealed but it still swelled and became uneven after awhile. The metal sanding disk works far better.
My grinder is also slower speed than a typical grinding wheel so you may want to consider adding a speed control (if you can) or make a sharpening system using an old motor, pulleys and drive belts to get speed reduction.
Bob S.

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<snip>

<snip>

The Shopsmith manual recommended an MDF disk, mounted to the aux tail stock, with adhesive backed abrasive paper, for touching up turning tools. Should work on almost any lathe.
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Good idea and as long as it doesn't get wet - should last a long time....
Bob S.

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Somebody wrote:

<snip>
You can also get 8"-9" steel plates to make a disk sander using a table saw which is a great use for an elcheapo table saw you don't want to pitch just yet.
Flat on one side, tapered on the other. (The plates, not the saw <G>)
Lew
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Those are handier than a pocket on a shirt, Lew. You can joint with them as well. You use the tapered side towards the fence and just take off a whisper. (After you tilt your disk so that it is 90-degrees to the saw.) It is amazingly accurate, but the big hassle is that the paper doesn't last and loads like crazy with pine, which quickly turns the shop into a fogpatch.... or so I'm told.
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wrote:

Use better paper. Hermes (available from CSM in the UK) do coated papers specifically for pine and similar resinous timbers. The coating does make a difference.
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Soap.
Open coat _and_ stearated would be even better.
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If it was soap, I'd have said soap. You can get soap from any maker. The Hermes stuff is something else (type BW114 if you want to look it up) and they claim it works by reducing static. Anyway it works really well on larch, which is a sod otherwise if it's a resinous bit.
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wrote:

Try soap. Ivory.
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Works OK for hand sanding, doesn't work for power. I'm talking about a 2" hand-held belt being used on carvings, with maybe 2'-3' total belt length. That's a hot-running belt.
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The wheels for typical bench grinders are not designed for using the sides as a grinding surface, though occasional light use is probably OK. However, there are grinders that do use a wheel that turns in a horizontal plane, many of them are "wet" grinders. Delta and Makita make one and Harbor Freight sells a cheap version.
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