Evaluating a 40+ years old craftsman bench saw?


I've inherited an old Craftsman 10" bench saw, model #113.27520 mounted on a craftsman universal stand, with a 1 hp motor. Its at least 40 years old? Very heavy, I just moved it to my house and I'm comparing it to the $100 delta 10" bench saw I was using.
Right away I can see the the fence and the miter guage have a much better fit and adjustments on the old craftsman saw. The tilt and hight adjustments are also better.
I'm interested in the size and shape of the actual table top. The delta is wider but has less feed room infront of the blade. The Craftsman if narrow but has more space in front of the blade. Seems this would help keeping a board flat while feeding???
What about the belt drive? Do they still build them that way now? what are the advantages or disadvantages to this?
Also can you suggest the best way to clean up the top of the table? It has a little rust on it.
TIA
Steve
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I have a Craftsman of about the same age. I inherited it from my father in law. Mine has 10" extensions on both sides of the main table. I like the extra space in front of the blade as it gives me more room when cutting angles. (I do a lot of picture strechers and frames.)
I have had the saw about twenty years and only recently had to replace the belt. I was able to buy it at the local hardware store. The biggest problem that I have is keeping the belt tension. Usually the weight of the motor is sufficient, but at times I must tighten the bolts on the motor plate to provide the proper tension for some jobs.
As for the table, assuming there is slight rust use a fine grade of sand paper to get rid of the rust. You must be careful the you don't create cups in the surface. Once the rust is gone, use a good grade of car wax on the surface, and KEEP the table covered when not in use. I use a piece of plywood the size of the table. This provides additional work space when I work.
You must keep the threads of the adjustment mechanisms clean and free of sawdust or it will jam a little and become quite hard to adjust.
steve wrote:

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I just found the original manual for the saw in a box.!!
What happens when you have trouble with the belt tension? I had to remove the motor to move the saw. I havent reassembled it yet. I used some navel jelly and steel wool on the table top and it looks much better.
I will clean out the screw drives but they work pretty smooth now.
I'm considering putting two wheels on the back legs and adjustable blocks on the front. This way I can slide it in and out of the corner.
Thanks
Steve
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Just curious: What type of motor does it have? My saw has a repulsion induction motor (which were discontinued by Emerson in 1953). If yours is only 40 years old, it most likely has a capacitor start induction run motor. Jim
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Its a Capacitor-Start type motor. I found the manual for that also.
Steve

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run motor will be somewhat smoother. Jim
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I am not familiar with this machine but in the 30+ year range Craftsman made some pretty descent saws, jointers and other shop equipment. Since you know the part number and have the book take a look at the Sears web site. People have varying opinions of Craftsman equipment but Sears seem to do a fairly good job of supporting their customers. You might find out that parts, extension wings, etc are still available.
A lot of the old equipment is a better value than that available now, if you can support it.
RonB
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wrote:

would expect the Craftsman to have a MUCH better fence ..

Bet you a dollar that the craftsman has Lost its extension wings...

Honestly I do not know of any of the "better" Tablesaws that do not use a drive belt...Universal drive is only to my knowledge (very limited) used on cheap saws...

Yes I would use steel wool and a little old motor oil ... or it it were real bad I would use some 320 grit wet sand paper ..also using oil...
Some one mentioned using car wax....everyone will jump on that ..(except me) .. I use it all the time since I also show cars and alwasy have some car wax that I did not like (for the cars)... Most will recommend a silicone free wax like butchers...
Personally I would much rather have that Craftsman then the 100 dollar Delta...
Bob Griffiths
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wrote:

suspect is a Delta benchtop saw. Modern "Contractor Saws" are built pretty much like the 113's and good ones can easily run $500 and more.

extruded aluminum fence, maybe a take off from someone who put a very expensive Biesemeyer on his Sears will sell you his Craftsman Acurip or whatever they call them. Plenty of fences always available on eBay.

years. Standard 113 wings are 10" wide and 27" long by about 1.5" thick. Most are cast iron or aluminum and are webbed, but there might be some cheaper tin ones floating around.

same setup with a motor hanging out there in the breeze. You can smooth it all up with the addition of a link belt and machined pulleys (if necessary).

product called TOPSAVER or something like that. In the interim, you can use a scotchbrite pad and WD40 to get the ugly stuff off. Once you get the top looking nice, use Butcher's Wax or some other hard carnuba wax (no liquids) and buff it out.

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I have a 27520 also and love it. It had two extension wings - cast iron which gives a nice big surface to deal with. Added a Craftsman Accurip fence and put a link belt and new pulleys on it and it just hums. Has same capacitor start motor. I put a WWII blade on it and it leaves glass smooth edges. It's old but IMHO better than most of what Craftsman sells today.
Vic
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