Epoxy for repairing rotted wood

I'm looking for the epoxy they used to repair a window sill on an Ask TOH episode. Tom Silva was using a large two part epoxy dispenser similar to a caulking gun. You squeeze the trigger and the plungers depress, squeezing out equal parts of the resin and hardener.
Any ideas? thanks jp
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Mon, Dec 10, 2007, 5:21pm (EST-3) snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (JayPique) doth mumble: <snip> Any ideas? Yeah. A BBQ sandwitch,with slaw and onions, along with a glass of milk. Oh, your problem. Check Rot Doctor. Not tried it, but it's supposed to be just the thing. Then paint it yellow.
JOAT Even Popeye didn't eat his spinach until he had to.
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"Jay Pique" wrote:

Mix your own.
Buy a small epoxy kit with slow hardener from West, Raka, System3, etc.
MIx small batches, then thicken with microballoons.
Apply with a popcicle stick.
Lew
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http://www.fiberglasssupply.com/Product_Catalog/Epoxy/epoxy.html About half way down the page.
If you're doing a lot of small repairs they make sense, but I still like the one-push pump dispensers that fit into the regular cans and jugs.
R
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JP:
It's not Silva's concoction but I just got through repairing some wood with Bondo's wood filler putty and am not only very satisfied with the results now but with the durability of repairs made over a decade earlier. It is not expensive if you get it in the gallon can at the Borg. On hot days, cut back on the hardener. On cold days, keep the can inside and put the catalyst in a moistened towel heated in the microwave to speed kickoff. Timing the kickoff is the hardest part of working with the material since you are usually not mixing uniform amounts. The more you mix, the greater your practical chance of losing part of the pot before you can apply it. Surform shaping can only be done early in the hardening phase. After that, its aggressive sanding. A marine person who uses this said it was resin and talc, the talc giving body to the mix against creep.
Regards,
Edward Hennessey
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http://www.advancedrepair.com/architectural_epoxy/architectural_epoxy.htm?gclid=CI-unN-VoJACFRFMYAod9QZvHw
The stuff they used on TOH Clay

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What for? To fill a hole, or to consolidate remaining softened wood.
Small hole filling: West System epoxy thickened with microballoons
Big hole filling: Car body filler, like P38 and probably styrene based. Cheaper than epoxy, and equally strong in bulk if not so adhesive. For areas that are going to carry hinge attachment loads etc., use the versions with filling fibres too.
Consolidation: An extra-thin styrene resin, sold for rot treatment like this. Investigate simple vacuum bagging techniques to dry things out first and to improve penetration.
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The Advance Repair products are good. Learn more about wood-epoxy repairs:
http://historichomeworks.com/forum/viewforum.php?f=4
http://www.historichomeworks.com/hhw/library/OHJEpoxy2004/OHJEpoxy2004.htm
http://www.historichomeworks.com/hhw/reports/reports.htm#Wood-Epoxy%20Repairs
John by hammer and hand great works do stand www.HistoricHomeWorks.com
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