Epoxy for filling holes?


Hi,
I had recently gotten advice for filling screw holes on the body of a piano (the non-musical port of the intrument) with epoxy, but I'm yet to figure out what type of epoxy. Epoxy that I have found at HD is a type of glue that you mix prior to application. Is that the stuff I'm looking for?
Also, someone recommended to mix it with saw dust to make it less brittle or for some other good reason. Is poplar a good wood for that (I happen to have some of that stuff now.)
Thanks!
Aaron Fude
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

All epoxies are two-part and most are mixed just before use. The exceptions are the epoxies that cure by heat or UV light and can be premixed. You won't likely find the latter in a retail store.
The stuff at HD is likely 5-minute epoxy or similar and tends to be cheap. Getting small amounts of good quality epoxy is hard. One possible option is to buy a West System's repair kit (about US$12) that comes with a couple of ounces of epoxy, some fiberglass and some silica gel (Cabosil). They also (used to?) sell a kit with several small packets of epoxy and nothing else - small foil packets like the ketchup containers in fast food joints.
If this is a fancy, expensive piano and you want a really quality repair, the better epoxy is worth it. If not, the HD stuff may suffice.

Epoxy will have the consistency of warm honey. Add some sawdust and it will be more like a paste and can be easier to work with. Wood flour is better than coarse sawdust. You should drill the epoxy before driving the screws - don't assume it will expand and let the screw in.
Mike
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I'd just use a countersink to make the holes the right size to match a corresponding plug cutter and plug the holes with wood. --dave

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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com spake thusly and wrote:

I would talk to a piano tuner fixer person before doing anything like that. Yours is more of a musical instrument question than a "wood" question.
Steve
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Hi,
I have tried what I described above (on a scrap piece) and completely failed. Perhaps I tried the wrong type of epoxy. Epoxy is a glue, right? I used the type that comes in a double tube with a double "pistion". Bascially, when mixed with poplar sawdust, it never solidified. What could I be doing wrong?
Thanks!
Aaron Fude
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You must have gotten a bad batch, though I never seen that happen. Try again with a different batch. BTW, people here have told you that, to get high quality epoxy, you have to buy large quantities of industrial stuff. Not true. Go to a good hobby shop. There is a brand of epoxy called Hobypoxy. Very good and in reasonable quantities. The type you got should have worked fine though. Must have been something wrong with it. Make sure you mix the epoxy first then add the sawdust.

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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com spake thusly and wrote:

I believe they make products especially for that like "plastic wood" and there are others that mix like epoxy but are specific wood filler. They are not dirt cheap but your time is worth something.
Steve
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