Epoxy

Using 1 hour loctite 2 part epoxy. Seems to dry brittle. Normal? I have little choice but to use epoxy as at -5/-15 F my shop can just hold 40. I glue and after about 4 hours bring it into house still clamped.
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"Lee" wrote:

Not sure of the specifics of your epoxy, but as a general rule, trying to use epoxy below 60F is a waste of not only epoxy, but also your time.
Lew
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Tue, Feb 12, 2008, 2:03am (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@tds.net (Lee) doth sayeth: Using 1 hour loctite 2 part epoxy. Seems to dry brittle. Normal? I have little choice but to use epoxy as at -5/-15 F my shop can just hold 40. I glue and after about 4 hours bring it into house still clamped.
Sounds dumb to me. I'd just bring it in the house to glue up.
JOAT 10 Out Of 10 Terrorists Prefer Hillary For President - Bumper Sticker I do not have a problem with a woman president - except for Hillary.
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote in (Lee) doth sayeth:

they much prefer Obama.
Billary,once pissed off,is very vicious. People who used to work for her have said so. It's a side of her the mainstream media doesn't report.

use incandescent lamps to provice a heat source.Make a tent over the work,put several lamps under it. In the summer,I put epoxy projects in my car's trunk to heat up and cure even better.
For really GOOD info about working with epoxies,visit www.systemthree.com,download the FREE Epoxy Book. I've used their Trial Kit.
Boat building epoxies are the best and most versatile. One-hour cure epoxies are good for low-load applications,not serious repairs.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
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Hadn't heard the car trunk one, but the warming tent is the easiest solution for most such problems. Halogen work lights throw off a lot of heat and can turn a fair size sealed tent into a low temperature oven.
R
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There is a brand called Cold Cure Epoxy - from epoxysystems.com, but it apparently is good to about 35F or 2C
If it is really important, they you should read up on cold weather epoxy at usage and options before you waste epoxy and make more work for yourself by having to clean up uncured epoxy.
http://www.westsystem.com/webpages/userinfo/moreinfo/coldtemp.htm
Some things are just too big to bring inside, and somethings just can't wait, so good luck with it. Let us know how it goes.
Matt

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Working temp -10F to 125f
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Lee wrote:

Working temp of _what_?
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Lee wrote:

Loctite epoxy wouldn't be my first choice. Spend the bucks for WEST or System III or Industrial Formulators and I think you'll be happier with the result.
That said the first thing I'd do is try an experiment. Make up some small text specimens and bond a couple or three in the house and a couple or three in the shop and see if there's a difference. If so then you've found the problem, if not then you need to look elsewhere.
If it turns out that the shop temperatures is the problem then there are some thngs you can do.
You say that you bring the piece into the house, clamped, so it seems to me that the obvious thing to do is bring it in and glue it inside. I realize that there may be SWMBO problems or the like that make that not viable.
If the bonding absolutely has to take place in the shop, then your best bet is to first warm everything up that you can--bring the pieces and the adhesive into a warm area and let it warm-soak overnight so that it's thoroughly warmed up, then take it to the shop, bond it as quickly as possible, and then bring it in as soon as you can.
You don't need to keep the whole shop warm, just the piece you are working on and the adjacent work surface on which you are mixing the epoxy. One thing to try is to make a curtained off area just big enough to work in using plastic tarps and put an electric heater (one of the oil-filled type that doesn't have any super hot surfaces is good) in that area. If the shop's at 40 you should be able to hold 70 easily in the working area that way. Once again, when everything is set up, let the pieces, the epoxy, and anything that you are going to be using to mix or apply it soak overnight so that everything is up to temperature before you start working.
If all else fails, http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p 013&cat=1,110,42965&ap=1 should solve the problem.
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--John
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Why wait the 4 hours to bring it into the house after gluing? Just glue it up out in the shop and bring it in to cure. If you wait a while after gluing and some joints set up partially, you may weaken them while making the move. Move the project while the epoxy is still fresh.
Pete Stanaitis --------------------
Lee wrote:

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The problems with using epoxy and polyester resins at low temperatures were identified more than fifty years ago. You can pay huge amounts to get resins that do work at low temperatures, the emphasis being on *HUGE*
Wait 6 months and you'll be able to make your epoxy work outside. If you need to use it before then just wait until SWMBO is out and do your glue up in the kitchen.
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Tue, Feb 12, 2008, 2:03am (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@tds.net (Lee) doth sayeth: Using 1 hour loctite 2 part epoxy. Seems to dry brittle. Normal? I have little choice but to use epoxy as at -5/-15 F my shop can just hold 40. I glue and after about 4 hours bring it into house still clamped.
So many details left out. What is it you're making that you think you need to use epoxy on? Why, if you take clamped project in the house, don't you just glue in in the houre to begin with? I use Titebond II, take my projects to the house, and glue them there, in the warm. Actually, any good wood glue would work for me, but I happen to like Titebond II. Probably that's all you need too. Details, details, details, you guys ask questions, but leave all the pertinent details out.
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off to 35 degrees F and don't squeeze the epoxy out of the joint by over clamping this will make a joint brittle and weak use epoxy liberal and and minimal clamp
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