Enlarging a router insert for better dust collection?


A small insert doesn't collect dust as well as a large insert because the small opening restricts the cfm. But a large insert doesn't support the work as well. Is this correct?
I was thinking that the insert behind the bit doesn't support anything, so opening up the insert there would increase the cfm and improve dust collection; make the opening an oval rather than a circle. Does this make sense?
Assuming you are with me so far, would it be reasonable to make this oval by screwing the aluminum insert to a block of wood, and going at it with a hole saw? The material left could be cleaned up with file. Or possibly a router? If I don't mind maybe dulling the bit, is a carbide router bit safe on aluminum? I know I once erred with my omnijig, and the router cut into the aluminum pretty effortlessly. I just don't know how safe it might be, again holding the insert screwed to a piece of wood.
If none of this makes sense, I broke a rib last week and the muscle relaxant doesn't agree with me...
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toller wrote:

it does, but my guess is that a series of smaller holes around the main (zero clearance) hole will be more effective and safer.

with all clamped to the drill press table, yes.

a little sandpaper may help too, for getting rid of sharp burrs.

it's pretty grabby, and the results of that grab are not pretty, for your fingers or the tools/materials.

it makes me nervous to do it. when I can I use a more appropriate cutter- one with a larger number of smaller teeth. there are some really good solid carbide die grinder bits with 1/4" shanks with tooth configurations made for aluminum out there, and they aren't really expensive.

excuses, excuses....
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That is a good idea, thanks.

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Sounds to me like all your dust collection is from below the plate. It also sounds like all your cuts are on the edge. I have never tried dust collection from under the plate but, it seems to me that it would be the least effective way to do it as the router fan is pushing air up past the bit, thus working against your dust collector. The table I have right now has no dust collection, something I plan to change here shortly. The one I used to have had dust collection through the fence. That was very effective. Virtually nothing escaped it on edge cuts.

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You are correct, all from below. I am using a TS wing, and it is difficult to get it above, though I might have to work on that.
My first table, a Crapsman which really earned the name, was all above. Still, half the debris went down.
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toller wrote:

Are you using a shop vac or a dust collector. If the latter, you might try the shop vac. The higher suction it produces gives much better results with small openings.
Also, I'd second the ported fence idea. It sounds like you're currently using the table saw fence, but you could build an auxiliary fence that attaches to it or rides on it. Port the aux fence for dust collection, and you'll be happier.
I collect dust via a shop vac and ported fence, and for edge cuts almost nothing escapes, even with MDF.
Chris
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Chris Friesen wrote:

I have had the same experience.
Shop Vacs work much better with hand sanders, biscuit joiners, routers, etc... than a choked-down DC.
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