Enlarging a hole for a deadbolt

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On Fri, 08 Oct 2004 02:19:32 GMT, "Doug Kanter"

DAMN... i had the same problem a couple of years ago... another, related problem was my the drill hole saw had about 1/2 of actual drill bit sticking out of the bottom.. I bought a longer bit, clamped a piece of scrap plywood on the other side of the door, marked the hole center on it and drilled the new hole.. Not a great way to do it, but it was easy (once i had the longer bit) and worked well for me..
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On Fri, 08 Oct 2004 02:19:32 GMT, "Doug Kanter"

Tack a 1/4" piece of plywood across the hole, use a hole saw to drill the new hole. Plywood acts as a guide, pull the tacks and a few tiny holes to putty and repaint.
Jeff
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wrote:

Just *jam* a piece of wood in the hole. Drill your new hole.
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1) Remove door from hinges and lay it horizontally on the table of your drill press. Support the outer portions of the door with a platform made of 2 x 4s and plywood (or OSB) left over from previous projects. 2) Adjust the height of this platform to match the height of your drill press table so the door is level. 3) Apply wide duct tape (or masking tape left over from a previous painting project) to the underside of the door hole, making sure to seal the tape around the hole in preparation for the next step. 4) Create a mixture of "Bondo" and wood chips recovered from your shop dust collection system. If you have recently cleaned out the dust collection system and don't have enough chips you may substitute 1/2 lb. of toothpicks run through your office shredder. (Many folks don't realize this little "trick of the trade"). 5) When it is about the consistency of toothpaste (Crest), pour it into the old hole, making sure to completely fill the opening. 6) When this 'plug" has set up, drill your damn hole!
;-)
wrote:

a
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You keep your used masking tape from previous projects? Seems strange that you're into saving stuff like that, but then want to waste some bondo and a 1/2 lb. of toothpicks to fill a hole that you're about to remove.
The best solution I read in the original thread was to cut the new size hole in a scrap of plywood. Clamp this over the old hole, and use it for a guide. Cut halfway through, then flip the door over and repeat from the other side. You can ensure correct placement for the back cut by placing alignment marks on some masking tape (new or old) on the door edge and on the plywood, then matching them up on the other side.
Waiting for Bondo to set? You're obviously charging by the hour. It certainly would work reliably though...
-Mike
wrote:

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A (very young) guy at Home Depot suggested that I just try and hold the larger hole saw really steady, and that hopefully, once it bit in 1/4" or so, the wood would guide it. Obviously, his dad never taught him the meaning of "cob job". :-)
I really appreciate all the GOOD suggestions here, by the way. Now, I'm waiting for the hardware store guy to key the new locks alike, and I'll select the most exciting idea from the list!
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Me! Me! Pick Me!

meaning
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Worst idea so far - my son's. He suggested I try enlarging the hole with a curved rasp. I told him "knock yourself out - just set aside the entire morning". He changed his mind. He emphasized that ***I*** was to do the work.

or
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On Tue, 12 Oct 2004 12:09:57 GMT, "Doug Kanter"
give him a dremal and a few dozen sanding drums.. lol

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On Tue, 12 Oct 2004 12:09:57 GMT, "Doug Kanter"

Okay, I've done this. When you're on site with no hole saw and you need to improvise, this one works reasonably well.
Jeff

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I've done it, too. But I don't wanna do it again. Perhaps I should let my son do it, though. He needs to learn.

use
the
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the
1/4"
I'm
I'll
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Hello,
I didn't see the original post, but from what I read here it looks like this "oops" arbor made by Starrett might just do the trick. It allows you to use two hole saws on one arbor. The "new" larger sized one cuts the properly sized hole, while the "old" original sized one guides it. I haven't used one yet, but it seems like a good idea.
Here's the link:
http://www.mcfeelys.com/product.asp?ProductID=hs-0019
Hope this helps, Peter.

or
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That is actually pretty neat. I'd probably test it out on a piece of scrap first, as I could see possible jumping out of the hole, but for $7 seems like a reasonable investment.

this
use
one
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You know, I was thinking that if you clamped your guide hole on top and a 1/4" piece of ply, or 1/8" piece of masonite on the bottom, the guide bit for the hole saw may go through the bottom piece (as long as the blade doesn't get through the door). This would give you a guide hole for the flip cut without resetting anything.
Just figure out how much clearance you have between the bit and the blade depth.
-Mike

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Of course, I could also change the guide bit to a much longer one. I've got some throwaway bits that I wouldn't mind filing a notch in to catch the arbor's set screw.

or
meaning
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On Mon, 11 Oct 2004 19:51:14 GMT, "Doug Kanter"

get the guys name at HD.... personal/corporate liability suit coming up.. *groan*
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meaning
Maybe I should go with his advice. Then, they can buy me a nice new door. The one I have is hacked and I'm too busy to strip & repaint it until spring.
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<snip>

Woodworks had a segment this week on making one out of Jarrah. Of course it came out beautifully. Doing one like that should keep you busy in the shop until spring!
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"patriarch snipped-for-privacy@nospam.comcastDOTnet>" <<patriarch> wrote in message

it
What I need is to win a small lottery. Just enough so I could take two years off and get this house in shape. I just moved in and there are some real oddities.
1) Green siding, but a purple front door, for instance.
2) Neighbors tell me the original owner managed a hardware store. But, there's absolutely NO indication that he hung anything with hooks or any other kind of fasteners. The day after I closed on the house, I went along the cellar beams with a flashlight. Not only were there no hooks or nails, but no holes of any kind. Same in the garage. Maybe he owned no stuff. Nothing. :-) How can you work at a hardware store and not spend part of your paycheck on "jewelry"?
3) Kitchen sink faucet is too long for the sink - it extends almost 80% of the way from the base to the edge of the sink where I stand. Makes washing big things a real pain. The stem is also apparently stuffed with Bondo. It takes almost 300 lbs of force to move it back & forth. (I know...a rebuild kit will fix it).
4) Half the windows are painted shut. There should be stiff penalties for that crime.
5) Outdoor lights were arranged to eliminate any possibility of seeing stars at night, and to completely blind anyone looking at the house. Owner apparently had fantasies of electrifying a prison yard. If I ever need to call the cops because of an intruder, they'll have to choose between approaching the house in total darkness, or wearing welder's goggles.
6) Bathroom tiles are Pepto Pink. Gotta go. :-)
On the plus side:
1) Awesome lawn done without chemicals. Half of it will be flowers and vegetables by next year.
2) New furnace (albeit a cheapo piece of crap Goodman unit), new water heater.
3) Amazing trees to break up the view, but they're on other peoples' property. Not much raking.
4) It appears someone cleaned the basement monthly using a magnifying glass and Q-Tips.
5) Four neighbors: One dead & gone, two old & quiet, and one with a funny little kid who has a fascination with his dad's push broom. He likes to sweep other peoples' driveways (but not his dad's). I'm negotiating a deal to have him actually scoop up what he sweeps and put it in the trash. He wants $0.25 per day, which is a great deal, considering how many maple thingies are flying around at the moment.
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You keep your used masking tape from previous projects? Seems strange that you're into saving stuff like that, but then want to waste some bondo and a 1/2 lb. of toothpicks to fill a hole that you're about to remove.
The best solution I read in the original thread was to cut the new size hole in a scrap of plywood. Clamp this over the old hole, and use it for a guide. Cut halfway through, then flip the door over and repeat from the other side. You can ensure correct placement for the back cut by placing alignment marks on some masking tape (new or old) on the door edge and on the plywood, then matching them up on the other side.
Waiting for Bondo to set? You're obviously charging by the hour. It certainly would work reliably though...
-Mike
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