Enlarging a hole for a deadbolt

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willshak wrote:

Got a router? Got a 3/8 cutter with a 1/4 shank? Extend the bit so it cuts the underside of the hole about 1/2 the thickness of the wood. Use the shank of the bit to run around the top edge of the hole. You have now enlarged the diameter of the bottom half of the hole by 1/8. Turn the door over, set the bit so it cuts what wasn't cut before. Repeat until the enlarged part of the hole is the correct diameter then switch to a 1/4 bit and trim the rest of the hole flush with the enlarged part.
Takes more time to tell than do, makes a nice vertical hole.
-- dadiOH _____________________________
dadiOH's dandies v3.0... ...a help file of info about MP3s, recording from LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that. Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico ____________________________
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Yet ANOTHER good idea! I don't think about my router at times like this because frankly, I'm not that skilled with it. Out comes the scrap wood for practice purposes.......
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2) Take a square scrap of wood. Draw a 1-3/4" circle with a compass. Make a pilot hole at the center. Line up the circle with the old door hole. Clamp the scrap in place. Drill the new hole using the scrap as your guide.
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Bore the correct hole in a scrap of ply, clamp this where you want the hole and bore away. The scrap will guide the outside of the holesaw. For the best results, bore the skin from both faces in.

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Eric Ryder said...

was dead easy.
--
Sti©ky

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I've also used this method with success. Make a little jig from scrap ply with a stop for correct backset, bore hole in it, and clamp to door. If you're like me, layout a horizontal center on door edge and jig so you can align both sides of the door accurately. AND remember, most lock sets allow some margin of error. You're lucky if you won't have to fool with filling the old lock mortise in. I spent 3 hrs last weekend retrofitting a Schlage unit to a mortised skeleton key setup. It was funny... Prepping the stock, fitting, and gluing up the mortise was easy, but matching the small unfinished areas of a 100 year old oak door took the majority of my time.
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[snip]

I found the article, just a snippet, really - "The Family Handyman" October 2004. pp 19. It syas to use two hole saws, the pilot saw the same diameter os the existing hole and the larger hole saw (the correct size) - install both. Go slowly until the pilot saw aligns the larger.
Looks soooo easy,
Josie
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That would work with the el-cheapo stack holesaw sets, but ain't gonna make it with my Lennox set.
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Ryder) writes:
| > [snip] | > | > I found the article, just a snippet, really - "The Family Handyman" | > October | > 2004. pp 19. It syas to use two hole saws, the pilot saw the same | > diameter | > os the existing hole and the larger hole saw (the correct size) - install | > both. Go slowly until the pilot saw aligns the larger. | > | > Looks soooo easy, | > | > Josie | > | > | > | > | | That would work with the el-cheapo stack holesaw sets, but ain't gonna make | it with my Lennox set.
The Starrett Oops arbor will fit your Lennox saws (as well as Milwaukee and Blu-Mol). It seems very handy in concept, though I admit that I have not opened it since I bought it...
                Dan Lanciani                 ddl@danlan.*com
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Really makes you want to slap the bejeezus out of whomever designed lock packaging containing the words "Easy Installation!" :-) Nothing in home repair is as quick as we wish it would be.
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Kanter) writes:
| OK, wizards - here's a situation I can't find a good solution to. I have a | Yale deadbolt in my back door, and want to replace with a KwikSet. The | backset (from edge of door to center of hole) is correct for Kwikset, but | the hole's size is too small. It's about 1-3/4", and the Kwikset requires | 2-1/8". I've got the right size hole saw, but without solid wood for the | guide bit, I can't see a way for the saw to work correctly. Using a saber | saw is a possibility, I guess, but I wonder if there's something more | elegant, as opposed to turning this into a cob job. | | Anyone got a cool trick?
Starrett has a special "Oops" arbor (seriously, that's the name) that lets you use one hole saw as a pilot for a bigger hole saw. It has a 1/4" shank and threads for both saw sizes. I think you might be better off just clamping a piece of wood over the hole as others have suggested, though. When my locksmith did this he used his normal lock jig. Versions of that are available at home stores.
                Dan Lanciani                 ddl@danlan.*com
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Cut a plug to fill the hole, glue it in place, then redrill. You'll even have a pilot hole.
djb
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a pilot bearing.
Bill
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Once again, the solution to this was illustrated in the latest edition of "The Family Handyman".
Mount two hole saws on the same arbor. Slide the larger one on first so it will be closer to the drill chuck, then slide the 1 3/4" saw on. Tighten both, insert the smaller one in the existing hole, using it as a pilot.

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Kwikset makes a drill jig for just this. I bought one about 15 years ago for my locksmith biz. And have made a pile of money with it. Call a local locksmith and pay him a lot of money.
Plan B is to take two pieces of thin plywood, and a couple C-clamps. Clamp plywood on both sides of the door. Use a carpenters square to mark where the hole oughta be, and drill with a hole saw. I personally can't encourage you to do this, cause it would deprive a brother locksmith of a house call.
--

Christopher A. Young
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"A brother locksmith"? Give me a break!

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I've had the same problem replacing Dexter Locks with Baldwins. Our local Ace Hardware Store has a kit that they rent out. It contains a large metal jig that clamps to the door and a 2 1/8 inch forsner bit. Easy, fool proof and fast. Takes about 4 minutes. They rent it out for about $20 for a couple of hours and require a $200 deposit to make sure you use it and bring it back.

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On Fri, 08 Oct 2004 02:19:32 GMT, Doug Kanter

If the new hole is concentric with the old hole, any of the suggestions given will work.
If they are not concentric, fill the old hole with catalyzed body filler, I've done a single pour, but two if you want to sand less.
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Use your 2 1/8" holesaw to drill a hole through a short piece of a 2X6 or similar, then clamp that on the door so the drilled hole lines up with where you need the new hole in the door. The (dare I say it) predrilled 2 1/8" hole will act as a guide for the holesaw.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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Using a saber

My hole saw setup lets a person attach two hole saws to one mandrel. In effect there's one hole saw inside a bigger one. Could you do something like that ~ put a hole saw for the existing sized hole inside the bigger one you actually want?
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