English wooden moulding planes - anyone still use them ?

Page 1 of 2  
It seems to be the "What plane shall I buy?" season again. As I've just spent an afternoon mucking out a crate of old moulders and getting them running again (and debugged !) I was wondering if I was the only one still left using them ?
Anyone else prefer an old moulder for making mouldings, rather than that noisy router ? Anyone else prefer the _finish_ of a planed moulding, rather than one from a small circular cutter ?
Anyone still bothering to use wooden plain rebate planes, or do you just stick with the funy shapes ?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I intend to try building a couple some day to see how I like them, but the steel work is still kind of intimidating. So for now I'll stick to the routah. How tough is it to do cross-grain moulding with a plane?
Ken Muldrew snipped-for-privacy@ucalgazry.ca (remove all letters after y in the alphabet)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 17:35:50 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@ucalgazry.ca (Ken Muldrew) wrote:

I've never understood that - maybe I'm just over-supplied for the things. They're practically firewood around here, certainly the rough ones - I've known toolshops pyrograph the sides and use them as gift vouchers !

Works OK, but you have to be careful. A good round will have a tight mouth, but some of the complex mouldings are pretty loose - this can be a problem. Some (mainly rebates and fillisters) have cross grain nickers but most don't. I just score beforehand with my marking knife. If I'm moulding free-hand, I tend to scribe a guide line first anyway.
--
Smert' spamionam

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 19:55:41 +0100, Andy Dingley wrote:

Looking through Tolpin's toolchest book: One of the student chests has a curved molding (flat stock, molding around an arc). Trivial with a power router, but I've never seen a hand tool that would do it. Cross between a compass plane and a molding plane? Have to whittle a new plane body for each curve... Or would one just use a gouge?
--
"Keep your ass behind you"


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 14:02:15 -0500, Australopithecus scobis

for shallow cuts, a scratch stock.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 14:02:15 -0500, Australopithecus scobis
Don't have it to hand, I'm afraid.

There are a few that can do it.
A moulding spokeshave - this is how it was typically done. Like this http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rd=1&itema19557507&ssPageName=STRK:MEDW:IT or http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rd=1&itema19559556&ssPageName=STRK:MEDW:IT
A variant on a cooper's croze - a cross between compass plane and moulder. These were mainly a cooper's or wheelwright's tool, because they're limited to a single radius.
A scratch stock. Short, but not very good cross-grain though.
There are also short moulding planes with "tailed" handles. These can often be persuaded to work short runs of shallow external curves, or even an internal curve if the sole has a little "belly" to it.
--
Smert' spamionam

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Where?
--
Dr. Juergen Hannappel http://lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de/~hannappe
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@physik.uni-bonn.de Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 21:37:23 +0200, Juergen Hannappel

Bristol, UK
So you can guess the shop 8-)
--
Smert' spamionam

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Now there's a gloat and a half! In all my searching I've only come across one. It was in an antique shop, the body was split in half, and the iron was a bent piece of rust. If I remember correctly, it was selling for $150. This thing wasn't even good enough for firewood.
If you ever come over here bring a suitcase full of them and sell them as antiques. You'll pay for your trip.
Ken Muldrew snipped-for-privacy@ucalgazry.ca (remove all letters after y in the alphabet)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ken Muldrew notes:

You need to check out ebay. Try "moulding planes" and "molding planes", no quotes.
In the first, there are some decent looking Brit planes, while there's a really nice US set (Rhode Island) in the second. That one is the highest of the bunch right now, at $45. Most are around or under ten bucks (and some aren't worth anything at all).
I don't know what the tax and shipping and whatnot would translate to in Calgary, but it should be less than 150 bucks per.
Charlie Self "America does not go abroad in search of monsters to destroy. She is the well-wisher to freedom and independence of all. She is the champion and vindicator only of her own." John Quincy Adams
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

Wow, there are a lot of them on ebay. I still want to make one but perhaps it would be wise to have a model to work from.

Many ebayers ship UPS, and sadly, a UPS cross-border shipment can easily be damn near $150. The worst part is the 40% they charge for filling out the customs form. I don't want to ever give UPS any more business for the rest of my days.
Ken Muldrew snipped-for-privacy@ucalgazry.ca (remove all letters after y in the alphabet)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@ucalgazry.ca (Ken Muldrew) wrote in

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Nope. They have a book that describes how to make them (which I have), but the closest that they sell is the Japanese wooden roundover plane.
Ken Muldrew snipped-for-privacy@ucalgazry.ca (remove all letters after y in the alphabet)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi, Ken,
Andy wasn't exaggerating - they are as cheap as chips over here. Go to any local auction or boot sale and you can pick up a boxful for a tenner. Or have a look at ebay (That's Ebay.co.uk, as opposed to Ebay.com. Look under collectables>tools and do a search on "moulding". At the moment there's a bunch from the mid 1700s, for less than 20 bucks each.
I have perhaps 10-12, but seldom use them. Using them isn't _that_hard if you're working long-grain in fairly mild wood, but some of the more complex shapes are tricky to sharpen. The really big ones took two men to work them. They had a hole bored in the fore-end with a rope through it - the master held the plane at the correct angle, and the apprentice towed it through the wood with the rope.
Cheers
Frank

--
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com ).
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ken Muldrew wrote:

Hmm. May I should link this back to the "Europe is a rip-off" post.
BugBear
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 20:46:45 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@ucalgazry.ca (Ken Muldrew) scribbled:

I'm surprised you haven't found any in Calgary. I've got about half a dozen in working order, found here in the Yukon in antique shops, the Dawson City Trading Post, etc. And I've only bought the good ones that were usable.
My brother has promised to send me my grandfather Luigi's set from Montreal. According to my mother, they were used to do all the chestnut mouldings in the apartment I grew up in. One of the first things my parents did when they got married was to strip off all the RBS and varnish the mouldings and doors. Larry prolly got his ideas about stain from my father who was disgusted with the North Americans practise of hiding the beauty of wood. An opinion which I share. But I'm not telling you when he's sending them, in case you're tempted to intercept the shipment.
Luigi Replace "nonet" with "yukonomics" for real email address www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/antifaq.html www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/humour.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Luigi let me ask, what is a "good" and useable molding plane? What do I need to look for in the qualities one should be in?
Alex
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
queried:

No cracks in the body, the iron still has its tang and is not pitted beyond recovery, the wedge fits and the profile on the body is still relatively crisp. Oh yes, and no rot on the body. Maybe one out of two or three moulding planes I have seen for sale is "good and usable". Sharpening is usually required.
Luigi Replace "nonet" with "yukonomics" for real email address www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/antifaq.html www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/humour.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yeah that sharpening is tricky and requires special stones for carvers. Alex
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
AAvK wrote:

Not that tricky and the stones are inexpensive enough. As a woodcarver I do it all the time and in fact I have several bent knives, gouges and a small scorp that I'm in the process of sharpening and tuning sitting on the desk behind me. (I work on them between working on the computer.)
What that sharpening is is time-consuming, especially on a complex profile.
(OTOH -- I sharpen my carving tools to a slightly convex cross section, which helps them cut the way I want them too. I don't know if that would be acceptable on a molding plane iron.)
--RC
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.