Engineered flooring got really wet

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Asshole. Grow the fuck up and get a life.
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On Sun, 27 Sep 2009 04:16:58 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@mts.net wrote:

Your mother would be so proud of your mastery of the English language!
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wrote:

Since you're asking for opinions, mine would be that you probably cannot re-use it or at least some of it. A lot of engineered flooring manufacturers suggest that it not be installed below grade so they are obviously concerned about moisture. If you cannot use all of it, you may have problems with the same style flooring coming from a different batch and possibly having a color match problem. My first suggestion would be to contact your insurance guy. Even If your deductible eats up your labor, you might still be able to get your material paid for.
Mike O.
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To the OP:
My flooring guy recommends NOT reusing any flooring that has been soaked with water. It is easy enough for you to see why. It warps, distends, and becomes misshapen. Worse, it loses its perfect dimensions, which makes those pretty closed joint installations possible since it will no longer fit together well.
My personal experience is that he is right. I tried to save some engineered flooring and reinstall after it had been covered with water for a day. Absolutely no luck. And the pieces I finally pounded and sanded into place looked like crap.
The good news is that you can take a sample of your current floor and buy replacement pieces that match pretty well.
Robert
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Or, if you can't get a really good match, you can shuffle the planks to reinforce the idea that variety is purposful.
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Sounds like a time to get the insurance company involved.

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Except that you now have the branding by the insurance company of having a house that has suffered water damage, enough to put you on the C.L.U.E. list. As a restoration/remodel/repair guy, this is important to know. Your claim, the amount paid, the amount of damage, and the type of damage will all be dutifully recorded. This will affect your insurance premiums (as in increase) until the unforeseeable future.
Most people have no idea this system exists. It started as an information sharing device between insurance companies to make sure they didn't inherit a latent claim from one another. Specifically, mold damage. Many years ago before water and mold claims began to be excluded from policy protection, there were claims from latent defects in property due to improper repair. A flooded house may have the walls stain killed and painted and the carpet replaced, but he mold lives on. In a particularly humid climate, it is only a matter of time before the mold asserts itself in a very aggressive way. And we all know the prodigious amounts of money paid for mold and water claims from plumbing leaks, hurricane and tornado damage, roof leaks, etc.
I no longer deal directly with insurance companies due to their lack of integrity. But in advising my clients, some will listen and some will not. Without ANY exception, those reporting water damage have either be canceled outright or face higher (around 20% or their premium) rates or policy modifications to exclude any claims from water damage. I am sure there are those here that personally know exceptions, but that's my experience.
At this point, the CLUE system is used by a lot of different companies for a lot of different reasons. Imagine seeing it used to negotiate against you in a real estate transaction. It will follow you around for future underwriting of insurance of both home, and now with its expanded coverage, your auto.
DAGS "Insurance CLUE list" and check out what you find. You can even find out information yourself now with sites like this:
http://www.choicetrust.com/servlet/com.kx.cs.servlets.CsServlet?channel=welcome&subchannel=clue
That information stays around for a long time, and could cost you thousands in future insurance premiums, as well as put a negative point against your property should you decide to sell it.
Just my thoughts as usual.
Robert
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I was aware of this BUT I was under the impression that this was only suppost to be a stigma attached to a home that had experienced flood damage and that would have the possibility of lots of hidden wet spots where mold could grow undetected. At least this has been the slant in Houston, expecially after the massive flood of 2001. And, I was kinda under the impression that he may have already had a water damage claim in so much that he mentioned that the floor was installed after hurricane Ike, last September.
Anyway you do have a very valid point and one should procede with caution concwening a claim especially if the home has not had the water damage badge on it's "Permanent Record".
wrote:

Except that you now have the branding by the insurance company of having a house that has suffered water damage, enough to put you on the C.L.U.E. list. As a restoration/remodel/repair guy, this is important to know. Your claim, the amount paid, the amount of damage, and the type of damage will all be dutifully recorded. This will affect your insurance premiums (as in increase) until the unforeseeable future.
Most people have no idea this system exists. It started as an information sharing device between insurance companies to make sure they didn't inherit a latent claim from one another. Specifically, mold damage. Many years ago before water and mold claims began to be excluded from policy protection, there were claims from latent defects in property due to improper repair. A flooded house may have the walls stain killed and painted and the carpet replaced, but he mold lives on. In a particularly humid climate, it is only a matter of time before the mold asserts itself in a very aggressive way. And we all know the prodigious amounts of money paid for mold and water claims from plumbing leaks, hurricane and tornado damage, roof leaks, etc.
I no longer deal directly with insurance companies due to their lack of integrity. But in advising my clients, some will listen and some will not. Without ANY exception, those reporting water damage have either be canceled outright or face higher (around 20% or their premium) rates or policy modifications to exclude any claims from water damage. I am sure there are those here that personally know exceptions, but that's my experience.
At this point, the CLUE system is used by a lot of different companies for a lot of different reasons. Imagine seeing it used to negotiate against you in a real estate transaction. It will follow you around for future underwriting of insurance of both home, and now with its expanded coverage, your auto.
DAGS "Insurance CLUE list" and check out what you find. You can even find out information yourself now with sites like this:
http://www.choicetrust.com/servlet/com.kx.cs.servlets.CsServlet?channel=welcome&subchannel=clue
That information stays around for a long time, and could cost you thousands in future insurance premiums, as well as put a negative point against your property should you decide to sell it.
Just my thoughts as usual.
Robert
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In article

Interesting. I had never hear of a CLUE list. Thanks for the heads up about that.
I deciphered your DAGS as "do a Google search", and put
"Insurance CLUE list"
in the Google search field, with the quote marks.
I only got two, not very informative, results.
When I put
Insurance "CLUE list"
in the Google search field, with the quote marks only around the last two words, I got better results.
--- Joe
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Joe wrote:

Yeah, I got thrown that, too, and I don't get it. I've *never* seen nor heard that outside of this group.
It's become part of everyday vernacular to just use "google" as a verb, as in, "Why don't you google it?"
Seems a lot easier to type, too. "DAGS" is much more awkward to type than simply, "google." You either have to hold down the shift key while typing with one finger, or you're pressing the caps lock before and after typing, which is the same number of key strokes as typing google.
Don't get it.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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I find that quite odd.

Sorry, I didn't mean for my posting to become confusing to anyone. I simply put DAGS as I was referring >>exactly<< to Google as a search tool. However, if you are less "search savvy", you should know there are search engines that are more intuitive and specialized depending on what you are looking for on the net.
Here are my favorite picks.
Yahoo Search - It routinely outperforms Google for shopping best priced items. Great for replacing software, extension cords, and many other items. As fair performer as an overall search engine but often returns different results than Google
BING - a new compilation of efforts from Microsoft and its acquisition seem to turn up better information for me to troubleshoot my computer and its software. Great tech info on a lot of subjects. I go there first for tech problems
Google - well obviously you know about this one. But there are other engines that search much better, and more on the way. The simple Boolean search will go the way of the dodo
Ask.com - great for instruction and procedure questions. It seems to concentrate on all manner of practical instruction articles and can be a real gold mine of info
And my favorite, http://www.dogpile.com the big dog. It is a bit slower, but accesses everything at once. VERY handy if you aren't sure where to start your searches, or know which engine will best suit your needs. Note that it will do a pretty good scan of all the engines listed above - in one shot.
I know there are many others that are favorites, and each sector of our society seems to have a favorite depending on their needs. There are many meta engines that combine the search capabilities of different engines. Here's a partial list:
http://www.cryer.co.uk/resources/searchengines/meta.htm
In my post, I wasn't intentionally trying to be obtuse. I forget that many computer folks don't look too far left or right, but just plug along with what they know. I saw my post as trying to be specific and I am not sure what you were trying to express about it. But at any rate, you did see it, you did remember DAGS from somewhere, and you were able to figure it out.
That's all that counts.
Robert
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Didn't the C-less LJ coin the DAGS acronym?
- Doug
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Doug Winterburn wrote:

I thought it was Larry but checking the Google archives it looks like DAGS was first proposed by Neil/Toolguy
" Toolguy      Feb 16 2003, 12:43 pm Newsgroups: rec.woodworking
Date: Sun, 16 Feb 2003 16:43:16 GMT Local: Sun, Feb 16 2003 12:43 pm
Subject: New acronyms for the wreck
I don't know how some of you do it? This site is so active and so many of the posts are by people asking stuff that's been answered a gazillion times before. Yet, I go through a few posts and there is more friendly advice and thought. I'm all for being friendly and helpful but I don't know where some of you get the time? Hats off to you! :>) Take a bow.
One the other hand, I feel it would be appropriate (for many posts) to do a Google search prior to posting questions. It would narrow down the questions from "Which router should I buy" to "Does the Bosch template guide apdaptor work OK".
So I propose 2 new acronyms which will alleviate replying time and and further questioning.
DAGS -Translated: Do A Google Search -If a poster puts up an obvious question that's been answered a gazillion times, simply reply with DAGS
IDAGS -Translated: I've Done A Google Search -A poster could add this tag to the subject line. Then all will know this person has gone the distance and now is seeking further advice. eg: "Router advice wanted-IDAGS"
Neil "
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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Well think about that Jack, What's to keep some from starting with a IDAGS? And to go a bit further, I would say that 70% of the time the question that gets a DAGS response also gets responded to with yet another way that I have not heard of.
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