Engineer's square

Page 4 of 6  
Doug Winterburn wrote:

Now that's clever--bending the hanger.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
J. Clarke wrote:

Again what I said -- it that's the intent, simpler to take the wire and bend it w/o the hanger itself. Of course, it assumes it's mounted in the chuck and up to the point at which the bend occurs is straight and perpendicular, otherwise it rotates around a non-vertical axis...
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
dpb wrote:

It's the same procedure as leveling the table on an RAS to the blade. You can use a coat hanger, a dowel, anything that gives you a reference height.
He's assuming you have a radial drill press or a table that moves laterally and in and out I think.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No, he's not. Bend the wire like a Z. Put one end in the chuck. Bring the table up (or the quill down) until the free end of the wire comes close to touching the table and turn the spindle by hand. Keep creeping down until the end of the wire touches the table all the way around as you turn the spindle. The further the end of the wire is from the spindle centerline, the more accurate it will be.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"CW" wrote:

================================ Clever.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lew Hodgett wrote:

Still relies on the center portion in the chuck to be perpendicular and straight else't the whole thing rotates around an inclined axis.
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
dpb wrote:

'Scuse? It's going to rotate around the axis of the quill, or it isn't going to rotate at all. :-D
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Morris Dovey wrote:

The point won't perfectly unless the vertical portion extended from the chuck is also aligned in that same axis. If there's any bend in it it will simply amplify that and you'd adjust the table to match.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
dpb wrote:

The objective is to have the table perpendicular to the quill, not to have either of them exactly vertical.
If the quill is bent, it needs to be straightened and until that is done there is no point in trying to align the table.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
J. Clarke wrote:

The point isn't the quill itself bent, it's finding a piece of hanger wire that isn't... :)
Whatever error there is in it is amplified by the radius or rotation...
The idea is ok, it's the implementation that has to be good to get it to work in practice....
--


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
dpb wrote:

The whole IDEA is to bend the frigging wire so that when you spin the chuck is traces out a circle in space that is perpendicular to the quill--you then align the table to that circle.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
J. Clarke wrote: ...

Indeed, which is what I've said... :)
_IF_ that circle is rotating slightly off-axis, the length of the wire to the point amplifies that and you align the table to it...
It relies for accuracy on the axis of rotation being colinear w/ the quill precisely...
--


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
dpb wrote:

Fine, you keep doing it however you're doing and the rest of us will go back to working our wood.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This method won't measure runout or even that the quill is parallel (much less collinear) to the axis of rotation, only that the plane of the table is perpendicular to the axis of rotation.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Machinists have been doing it this way for at least 150 years. I, myself, have done it hundreds of times (yes, I am a machinist). It doesn't even matter if the chuck or spindle is bent, this method will get the table perpendicular to the spindles axis of rotation.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
dpb wrote:

The distance from the chuck to the tip of the rod will remain constant, allowing to square the table.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No need for it to be strait. No matter what shape it is, it is not going to change the spindle axis. The wire will rotate around that axis.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The idea is to sweep a circle having a common center point and length. If it grases the surface in a circle - turning by hand - if it digs in - that side is high....
It is simply a single rod that is bent off center to sweep a circle.
Martin
dpb wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Grazes the surface that is :
Martin H. Eastburn wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Very entertaining thread! Thanks guys. With all the stress and anxiety these days, I really appreciate a good laugh every now and then.
Yep, all you need to do is bend up a wire coat-hanger and sweep the drill press table with it's tip. Keeping in mind that it's going to be all springy and bouncy, if you're good at making such subjective "hear the scrape" judgments, then you can get adequate results. Primitive, but feasible. Not much different from the goofy idea of holding a square up against a drill bit.
Honestly, I can't understand why people go to such extremes to avoid dial indicators. It reminds me of the guy who says "I don't need to know how to read; I learn all I need to know by watching TV and listening to the radio." The excuses for some people's aversion to dial indicators often sounds just like the ignorant excuses that illiterate people use to justify their situation. They put themselves thorough all sorts of absurd and convoluted procedures so that they can cope in a world where everyone else can read. A bent up coat hanger? Geez! Cough up the $10-$15 for a dial indicator and learn some useful skills.
<shameless_plug> You'll find all you need to know about using dial indicators on your table saw at:
http://www.tablesawalignment.com
Sign up today! </shameless_plug>
I completely understand some people's reaction to most dial indicator jigs on the market today. Heck, the vast majority do nothing more than a simple dial indicator on a stick. Some do even less! It amazes me what some people sell, but it amazes me even more that people buy it.
Thanks, Ed Bennett snipped-for-privacy@ts-aligner.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.