End Joining Boards for Panels?


I want to glue up some scrap boards into panels, but the boards I have are shorter than the panels I need. So, I'm curious if there is an easy, and Inexpensive method of gluing boards end to end?
I'd like to glue up a couple of boards end to end. Then cut those to width, and glue them side-to-side into panels (staggering end joints, of course). Then I'll run the panel through my planer and cut to size. That's the theory anyway.... :)
I thought about getting a finger jointing router bit, but Rockler wants $75 for one of those ($137 for the adjustable kind)! Ouch... The wood isn't worth that much. I'm just trying to use up my scraps, and then I won't need to do this anymore. So I don't want to make a huge investment.
I thought about a tongue and groove, but that's a fair amount of labor, and I'm not sure how it would look when I plane the panels to thickness.
Also thought about cutting the two boards on a bevel, but wasn't sure if that would really be any stronger than a simple end-to-end butt joint. It would also be difficult to clamp up?
Any tips?
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HerHusband wrote:

First, end-end would break in about a second.
Two, I wouldn't plane after the glue up. You're asking for the piece to tear and explode in the planer.
If i HAD to do what you want to do, I would make a half lap joint. the longer the better (more gluing area).
If you want a cool design element, how about a dovetail? Like this:
http://www.leighjigs.com/data/D4U_Ch12.pdf
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I did a test glue up yesterday, end to end. Took it out of the clamp, grabbed each end, and "snap" it popped apart at the seam... :) No surprise, eh...

Why? I routinely plane glued up panels and have never had a problem? For that matter, I routinely run multiple boards simultaneously through the planer without problems? Am I missing something here...?

I'm currently experimenting with a scarf joint. Made up a quick jig to make the scarf cuts on my miter saw. Will have to wait and see how that works out...
Otherwise, I'll try the half lap approach.
Thanks!
Anthony
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I cut them square, butt them up and make sure the joits are staggered and make sure that the outside pieces are continuous (not pieced). I have done this for drawers side. The structural compromise is inconsequential and a drawer side has minimal visual impact. I would not do it on an heirloom piece but I did this on a few kitchen drawers to use up scrap maple.
-Steve

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A similar layout worked for me when making cabinet shelves about 18" x20", though I also used biscuits to strengthen the joints. My pieces were all planed to the same thickness to start. With careful gluing and clamping the joints only needed a light sanding. Looks fine, seems plenty strong. I do not think I would use this method for exposed panels unless I used it on all pieces as a design element for a "patchwork quilt" effect.
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HerHusband wrote:

Dave
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It's just for the panels in my garage cabinets. But, I'm still experimenting... Enough experiments, and I won't have any wood left... :)
Anthony
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HerHusband wrote:

gotcha. I used 1/4" white vinyl clad mfd for my cabinet doors which I wouldn't be caught dead with inside the house! <g>
Dave
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HerHusband wrote:

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As luck would have it, I had an idea for some new cabinets in my garage. I have to make some measurements, but if I end up building them, I'll need several short panels. So, I may be able to make use of the shorter boards as-is... :) We'll see... I'm still experimenting with end joining though. It may come in handy later even if I don't use it now.
Anthony
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a.b.p.w. Strong as end-to-end joints go, but I wouldn't recommend it for your panel<g>.
--
Alex -- Replace "nospam" with "mail" to reply by email. Checked infrequently.

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some scraps left over. I biscuit jointed two pieces end to end and used them to make up the back-most piece in the top panel. It came out fine. Now... it was only two weeks ago, so I don't know what the long term results will be, but I can't see why they shouldn't do okay.
You want to make up a whole panel like that, right? Obviously it won't have the strength of a sound panel and will look a little odd; but if those are not problems it ought to be okay to just biscuit them like I did.
Some might argue that the end grain will move differently than the biscuit and cause problems; but biscuit grain is at a 45, so it shouldn't give any more problems in end grain than in face grain since it half way between the two.
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wrote:

Assuming this is not a troll, like what colour to paint the workbench...
If the final product is not too large, do T&G along the lengths. Clamp lengthwise as well as across. The glued T&G will hold to give strength to the end glue-up. It will still look like something I'd use to keep warm.
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HerHusband wrote:

http://www.motor-manufaktur.de/werkstatt/09_yadro/en_index.html It gives you the same stuff they sell as paint grade trim at the BORG. Joe
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I'm going with a scarf joint, which may not be easy to make, or a half lap, which is roughly the same thing.
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Gordon Airporte wrote:

joints?
Dave
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Nope.
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HerHusband wrote:

I've made a few things from glued up short pieces. There are two tricks I'd say. One, best have several small staggered joints than one large one. In that case the end joints need only be simple butt joints because all the strength comes from the edge joints...
good bad __ __ __ ________ | | | | | | | | | | | | |__| | | | | | | |__| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |________| | | | | | | | |__| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |__| | | | | | | | | | | | | |__| | | | | | | |________| | | | | | | | |__| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |__|__|__| |________|
And two, all pieces must be EXACTLY the same width. I've used a router table setup as shown below...
| fence --> | |__ | | | | <--wood | | | | | |O <--straight bit | | | | | | |__| | |
Machines each piece perfectly and each the exact same width.
Another concern is to chop the end of each piece as clean and square as possible.
Gluing up can be tricky. Getting all glued and clamped and flat is a lotta fun.
After it dries, run it through your planer and you'll have a spiffy new panel with a bit of a hardwood floor look to it.
Hope that helps,
Joe Barta
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