End Grain Drilling Wood Posts?


I need some advice on end grain drilling.
I've fabricated some posts for a patio cover. They are octagonal, 4-inches across the flats. Double helix spirals, -inch diameter, -inch deep are cut along the length of the posts at a 3-foot pitch. The wood is #1 and #2 DF cut down from 6x6's.
I need to drill a -inch diameter hole coaxially up the center of each post, about 9-inches deep. I want to know what's the best drill bit to use that would least likely cause splitting. I've heard that a regular twist bit, like is used for metalworking, is okay. I have a quote for an 'end-grain point' modified brad point bit for $113, a little more than I expected. Maybe a ship auger would be fine?
I haven't attempted any drilling yet. I don't really know how likely splitting would be, but I'd like to protect the work I put into these posts up to this point. I could place clamps on the wood while drilling to keep the posts from expanding. Maybe that would be enough?
Thanks for any advice,
Steve Noll | The Glass Block Pond | http://www.kissingfrogs.tv
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If a bit is causing a wedging action so as to split the post, it is a lousy drill. It won't be a problem. An auger or spade bit will work fine. The chips will have to be cleared frequently with either one.

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Steve Noll wrote: > I need some advice on end grain drilling. <snip> > I need to drill a -inch diameter hole coaxially up the center of each > post, about 9-inches deep. I want to know what's the best drill bit > to use that would least likely cause splitting.
I'd use a ship's auger to drill the hole and since I'm a belt & suspenders kind of guy, a couple of hose clamps around the piece while drilling.
BTW, for $30, Jamestown Distributors will sell you a 3/4" dia x 12" lg s/a.
Lew
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