Elmers Ultimate Glue or Gorilla Glue - TIA

I have been using Elmers Ultimate glue on a project and I have found it expands and leaves nasty glue marks on the outside of the finish project that I have been sanding off.
In very tight corners it is most nearly impossible to sand, especially across the grain.
With the old Elmers wood glue or white glue. I used to wipe it down with water and that would remove most, if not all of the glue so sanding would not be a problem and the wood would take a nice stain.
Is there a way one can prevent or easily remove the extra residue of Ultimate glue or gorilla glue before it dries so I don't have the problems of sanding in tight corners?
Does anyone have any special tricks up their proverbial sleeves?
Thanks,
Larry
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Happiness is wrote:

Masking tape?
Waxilit?
Chris
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blue tape. saves a ton of time and better yet, saves you from some nearly impossible-to-remove glue squeeze out mess.
Dave
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Happiness is wrote:

Throw the cr^h^h stuff out.
For what specific purpose/need are you using a urethane glue, anyway? It's only real advantage is if you _must_ have a fully waterproof (not water-resistant) glue, otherwise yellow glues are as strong as or stronger than the wood itself (as is demonstrated that edge joints will hold and the material break rather than the joint itself). Besides the foaming and difficult cleanup, the open and clamping time for these is much longer than for yellow glues which slows down progress. So, unless there's a real purpose not otherwise served, I recomend going back to a regular wood glue. If you need the water resistance, look into Type II or Type III water solubles.
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Acetone cuts through Gorilla glue when it is still sticky.
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Expansion and foaming are characteristics of polyurethane adhesives. If you don't specifically need their properties then stay with one of the PVA glues.
Best bet, as others have suggested, is to mask.
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is a very good glue and has its uses. Do not assume it's expansion characteristics will fill a poorly made joint, it will fill it, but it has virtually no strength when used this way. I use it on projects that will be exposed to weather or dampness and if I need the added open/working time polyurethane glue provides.
Dave
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Happiness is wrote:

As for polyurethane glue - tried it (naive enough to believe the ads). Found it seriously wanting, especially in outdoor usages. For
For my money, its TiteBond III for external usages and plastic resin glue for things that need a long open time. (Saw David Marks use a lot of plastic resin glue, now I know why)
To date, I have not been disappointed in either. Also, both are much easier to clean up.
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What I use to remove excess glue from corners is just a scraper designed to get into corners (They are usually are available in sets at most hardware and paint stores) being metal they are easy to clean off. If you have any excess that squeezed between the scraper and wood, try wrapping a solvent dampened rag around the scrapper and scrub a little.
Hope this helps
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