Elliptical leg

Page 2 of 2  

Piece of wood+drawknife+spokeshave=eliptical leg.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

At some point carving it by hand is the cheaper way to go. Of course its a little difficult to make a bead or cove using only a drawknife, but your point is well taken nonetheless.
Besides carving...
a person could also fabricate this from gluing up multiple sections of split turnings...
or use a copy lathe like they do for oval axe and hammer handles...
or program a CNC lathe...
or turn a hollow tube and steam bend into an oval by squishing it in the middle...
all sorts of ways! Dan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If I were to do this, and I didn't want to hand carve it, I would likely do it on a CNC vertical mill. "Didn't suggest that as few people have that at their disposal.

a
split
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

do
Speaking of ovals. My oval turning lathe is nearing completion. I've been working on it for over three years. And no, it won't do oval spindles! Dan
http://www.claycritters.com/lathe /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It's not elliptical, really, and in any case needs some handwork at the end to blend it, but you certainly could get "close" with 3-center turning, the same way many "oval" things are turned on regular lathes.
You tun on center to the profile you want the "fat part" (long axis of the oval/ellipse) to be.
You go offcenter and turn one side down to (or as close as you want it to) the centerline. You turn the other side to match. You're a lot closer to where you want to be when you pull out the inevitable spokeshave, and the evitable or not rasps, files, and sandpaper.
Try some test pieces - there's a bit of a trick seeing/feeling when you've gotten the sides where you want them.
A lot more accessible to most mere mortals than anything that will cut a true ellipse leg shape.
Or the really easy (but slow) way - turn the leg round out of green wood, and wait for it to dry. Differential shrinkage will get you quite a ways along with this approach.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 20 Apr 2005 13:06:55 -0400, mare

You can get close with a lathe. I think I saw Roy do it a few years back. Think of the profile as two circles with different centers. Lay the circles and centers out on the end of the stock, and turn it once with each of the two centers. Gets you close to an ellipse - if mathematical precision is vital, nevermind.
I seem to recall that Roy had some fun with the very unbalanced work in the lathe - speed is probably not your friend in this case.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It is, sorry. In a true ellips, there are no circle sections. The angle changes gradually. I want a leg the has (more or less) the same profile as the table.

It doesn't sound very safe to me.
--
mare

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You also can get a good start with a router with a 1" round over. Draw the ellipse on each end for reference. Round over all 4 side corners. I would then use my planer to reduce the place(s) that have the largest difference from the reference ellipse. Keep going until the shape is getting close. Finish by sanding.
We once renovated a kitchen, and put in a pair of cabinets that were rounded instead of having square corners. I had to make the curved quarter-round molding. Started with oak planks, cut the curves close to shape. Make many trips up and down the stairs for test fits. Once the curve fit, turning into quarter round wasn't too difficult.
Good luck Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Is a thumbnail router bit profile a 1/4-ellipse? If so (or, even if not), this would get the OP even closer to the final desired cross-section shape before having to sand/scrape/plane/spokeshave/etc.
Just a thought, Chris
Steven and Gail Peterson wrote:

Draw the

would
difference
close.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Offset turning is not all that hard if you chuck it properly. For a true ellipse, the turning on the lathe will get you very close with 4 offset setups. Finish with a spokeshave and card scrapers.
Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
mare wrote:

It is safe -- find the ornamental turners that I mentioned. There were some links in the rec.crafts.woodturning forum that I mention -- about a month ago? Interesting stuff.
I actually bought a 4 jaw independent chuck with this in mind...
And have some fun.
--
Will
Occasional Techno-geek
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Here's what I would do:
Laminate solid stock to yeild a 4x2.5 block
Draw your elipse on the end of your block
Rip 4 facets do that you have something that looks like a squashed octagon (stop sign). A 12-sided figure (6 rips) would be even better. Each rip should be tangent to the drawing of the elipe on the end of the block.
Double the number facets with a hand plane flattening each "corner" ( I think I would reach for my #5, but any bench plane would do).
Now you sould have something approaching a eliptical cross section. One more pass on each of the "corners" with a hand plane and you should be able to start in with abasives.
-Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Make yourself an elliptical router jig that would find around your stock. The jig would just be two ellipses that were the size of the target ellipse plus the router depth of cut. The bit would pass between the two sides of the jig while the router base rode on the outer diameter of the jig.
Neil
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Does it need to be solid? I'd think in terms of cutting a number of elliptical disks of plywood, wrapping them with bending plywood to make an elliptical tube, and then veneering the outside in a vaccuum bag to yield your leg.
OTOH, for an elliptical section this small I'd probably do it by hand rather than worrying about a machine setup. Lay up a big enough blank, knock the corners off on the table saw and then use a hand plane or spokeshave to refine the shape (great excuse to buy the really sweet spokeshave from L-N. Make a cutout of the profile in a piece of plywood to check the shape as you go.
I've seen lathes for elliptical facework--mechanical contraptions that slide the headstock back and forth to keep the cutting position constant, but never lathe to turn an elliptical spindle. See <http://www.elliptical-turning-association.co.uk/index.htm for examples.
Roger
mare wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Drawknife to rough it out. Spoke shave to refine. Plane at the end to make sure you don't have any bumps. Should take about a half an hour.
-j
message

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 20 Apr 2005 14:36:27 -0700, the inscrutable "J"

Seconded!
======================================================== Save the Whales + http://www.diversify.com Collect the whole set! + Website design and graphics ========================================================
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 20 Apr 2005 13:06:55 -0400, mare*Remove*All*0f*This*I*Hate*Spammers*@mac.invalid.com (mare) wrote:

This is a perfect opportunity for a snipe hunt.
Draw the ellipse of your dreams up and cut it out on the bandsaur or with whatever you have that will make the cut.
Having created a pattern - take that sucker out and look for a really perfect piece of wood that fits it.
By that I mean that the wood is interesting and that the natural lines fit your pattern.
Old timey boat guys do this when looking for white oak knees for their projects> I hope that your project isn't white oak, because the boat guys are pretty thorough.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You poor guy.
You have gotten at least 7 *completely different answers to this problem:
1. Table saw rip then plane 2. eccentric turning 3. Pure neander (draw knife/spoke shave) 4. Router template 5. Router bit (actually quite diffrent than 4) 6. Skelletin with skin 7. "Find the right tree"
Sorry, but since all of these are reasonable ('cept maybe the tree one) I find that amusing.
Let us know what you choose.
-Steve
Sorry if I missed one.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Indeed I am. I could be a girl though.

Well, it's better than no answer at all.

I'm probably going to try number 4, but might also talk to a aquintance who is a professional turner, to see if he can do me a favour on his bosses expensive lathes.
Thanks for all the answers, my head is still spinning. It's almost elleptical now.
--
mare

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I happen to agree with the rough-cut and plane folks. Here's my contribution: Use the old fashioned moulding planes known as hollows and rounds. The sole and iron of the plane are rounded to cut convex and concave shapes. They come in sets with different radii, but you will probably have the most luck finding them at a flea market. You will probably need at least two hollows (with a concave sole...for cutting convex curves) with radii that approximate the major and minor radii.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.