Electrical question about a switch

About a month ago, the magnetic switch on my Griz 1023SL gave out. The result was the inability to shut the saw off and relay didn't kick out for a full 30 seconds after I shut the power off at the breaker. Grizzly was very decent about and allowed me to swap it out for a new one even though I was three weeks out of warranty.
My question is a result of my suspicion that the replacement will go out in time too. When (if) that happens again, I'd like to swap it out for a standard on/off switch. Since it appears to be next to impossible to bypass the relay on the current one, I'd be looking at a different switch. The saw draws 18 amps at 220 which is a horse - my question is the degree of switch I'd need for a replacement. I see that the 220v contractor saw that Griz sells is non-magnetic and is rated at 15 amp - would this suffice or if there is something else I should do, I'm open to ideas. Hopefully, nothing will be necessary but I tend to try and solve problems before they even arise. Sure results in allot of potential problem solving?
Don
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wrote:

You Americans scare me...
If your magnetic switch (whatever sort) failed, then get a decent one. It's no reason to discard _all_ magnetic switches, along with their no-volt benefits and the ability to easily add remote e-stop buttons.
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I didn't ask you whether I should or not, my question surrounded the size that would be necessary. BTW - there are many 15 amp products that don't use magnetic switches. While I'm hoping I don't have any more issues, I'm gathering info in case I encounter a 2nd failure. As to finding a "good one" - fine, but I'm not sure they are all they are cracked up to be. What does it give me? - the ability to not come back on in the event of a power failure. A last note - I'm sorry we Americans scare you, but next time you look up at the moon, picture the stars and stripes that are on the surface - alone. Not bad for country slightly over 200 years old.
Don

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I know you didn't ask, but in the interest of protecting someone who reads this thread and decides to do the same thing you are contemplating:
You should not bypass the mag starter. If you will look at where the motor wires hook up at the bottom of the contactor you will notice a little wheel that has numbers such as 10-20 or something like that. This is set to a little over the FLA of the motor so when you overload the motor, the heaters (overloads) will shut off the motor, thereby saving you about $300.00 from not having to buy a new motor (yours just went up in smoke without an overload). If you put in a regular switch, even if it is motor rated, and do not have a motor with overload protection (usually a little red popout button on the side)and the Grizzly does not, then you are asking for trouble, a burned up motor at best, a fire in your saw at worst. And no, your breakers will not protect your motor.
But do what you want, it's your money.........and saw..........and shop.........and life.
Jamie
D. J. Dorn wrote:

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Amen.

True.
Yep.
HTH
Lew
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That is a very good explanantion and I thank you for the time. It makes much more sense now and I've learned something. If this one goes, I'll simply replace it or try and get a high quality relay for it.
Don

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Good to hear. I have had mag starters that are still going after 22 years. The Grizzly ones are actually pretty good, I have about 15 of them in my shop and none have gone bad, you probably just got a bad one. I forgot to add, the starters are actually two parts, the contactor and the overload, and they can be replaced individually. The post about being able to put on/off switches anywhere is a good one, I am in the process of putting control stations (on/off switchs) in 5 places in my shop for the DC system, and I just have to extend the three wires from the control circuit to anywhere in my shop.
Stay safe,
Jamie
D. J. Dorn wrote:

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"D. J. Dorn" writes:

<snip>
Get a HP rated device from a major control manufacturer.
Take your pick, Allen-Bradley, Cutler-Hammer, General Electric, Square-D.
They all make a decent product for this application.
HTH
Lew
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wrote:

Hey, it's your fingers and it's your healthcare bill. Be my guest.
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The joker who built the magnetic switch on my used table saw used a relay rated for 1.5hp on a 2hp motor. It eventually fused. (he used two poles of a 4 pole relay, as if that would help)
I replaced it with one rated to 3hp for $30; has worked fine since.
So, if Grizzly is using crappy relays I expect you can replace it.
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