Electrical Question

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Man, I'd love to have that kind of problem!
If you work by yourself it's unlikely you would be running more than 1 tool plus a DC and lighting (and perhaps an air compressor?) at the same time. 60 amps min should do. I would want to put a subpanel in the garage of at least 60 amps, probably wouldn't cost much more to go to 100 assuming the main panel is compatible. You would have to install a 2 pole breaker in the main panel, a 60 or 100 or whatever panel in the garage, and adequately sized wiring between them.
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Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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Thanks all. You have given me something to think about.
If I do install a sub-panel, I might as well go as big I can. With that I will have to check my main panel in the house. I know it is a Square D 100 amp service. This might have to be upgraded as well as there is only af ew opening left for additional breakers.
Bill
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Bill Davis Jr wrote:

If you are running out of breaker slots you can double up by using some Square-D "tandem" breakers. They're two breakers that take a single slot. See:
http://www.homedepot.com/prel80/HDUS/EN_US/diy_main/pg_diy.jsp?BV_SessionID=@@@@1414590343.1129846360@@@@&BV_EngineIDcdaddfmldejiecgelceffdfgidgjl.0&CNTTYPE=PROD_META&CNTKEY=misc/searchResults.jsp&MID76&N)84+3004&pos=n04
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Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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Bill.
If your main breaker (or fuse) is a 100 amp supply you probably need to find out from your utility company what it will cost to upgrade to at least 200 amp supply.
My place runs 50 amp for stove/oven 30 amp for water heater 20 amp for furnace 15 amp for wall outlets (3 circuits) 10 amp for lights (4 circuits)
Upgrade the main box for the house and add a subpanel for the garage.
You are probably going to have to add or upgrade the house wiring unless you are running gas for stove / water heater / space heater.
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On 20 Oct 2005 17:53:32 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

From the utility company's point of view, it probably won't cost a cent. Odds are they won't even change the feeder. That's what happened when I upgraded from 100A to 200A in Illinois several years ago. Even if they were to change the feeder, they may eat the cost (just like running service to a new site) as a loss leader against future earnings.
The costs will be in the load center (breaker panel w/ main breaker) and new breakers. That's if he does it himself, although it's not for the inexperienced or faint of heart.
If an electrician does it is where the costs come in and it could be anywhere from as low as several hundred dollars (plus the load center and breakers) up to a coupla thou. Yes, I've seen estimates that high quoted right here on the wreck.
And don't forget the permit (cost usually nominal, like $40).
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LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
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Bill wrote:

<snip>
Not necessarily so.
You will need a space in the existing load center to install a 2P-60A, branch C'kt Bkr.
The 2P-60A is used to protect the sub feed to the garage.
If you have one, use it and get on with life.
If you don't have branch spaces, then you might as well upgrade to a 200A main panel.
Lew
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