Electrical conduit on the floor ?

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I guess you didn't read the links to the manufacturer sites upthread a few notes. The NEC standard does not require EMT to be protected at all but I have never seen any that wasn't. Back in the 20s it was painted but anything since WWII is galvanized, either electroplated or hot dipped. When I was a state electrical inspector I saw stuff in government buildings that went back that far.
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[isn't galvanized (to insert context)]

I only checked one manufacturer (I found a listing of 65 of them on some website), but Allied clearly states that their product is galvanized.
http://www.atcelectrical.com/conduit/ATC_prod.php?P=EMT
Ah, the marvels of the web and search engines ...
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I must agree that it IS galvanized. Try welding to it and you will find out.
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wrote:

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&ie=UTF-8&q=EMT+galvanized&btnG=Google+Search
Gary
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Southland)
Could be you and I have egg on our faces. I am almost certain I have seen stickers on some EMT that says it is aluminized, but I'll be damned if I can find anything that indicates I'm right when I do a search on the web. Maybe my next trip to an electrical supply warehouse will bear fruit.
Harold
Harold
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There has been aluminum EMT.
It is rather famous for destruction of concrete buildings where it has been embedded in concrete.
I cannot recall if the best book on the subject is "Design and Construction Failure" or "Construction Failure" or "Why Buildings Fall Down", or one of the similar books. But one of them has a good piece on it.

can
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There are several types of metal conduit - the most common being EMT (zinc electoplated steel in most cases, cold galvanized in others) , Rigid conduit (heavy walled steel conduit) and aluminum conduit(similar to rigid but "soft" aluminum) EMT, or Electro Metalic Tubing is connected with clamps and sleaves - it is too thin to thread. Rigid and aluminum comduits are generally threaded.

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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Back when I was doing wiring there was a new product just comming out called IMT ( I think ) Intermediat Metalic Tubing. Is it still around? ...lew...
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wrote:

Yes it is it takes the same threaded connectors as rigid even though it's slightly smaller in diameter.
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been
Construction
How does aluminum damage concrete?
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On Mon, 12 Jul 2004 21:07:19 -0400, "Shawn" <shawn_75ATcomcastDOTnet> wrote:

It sets up a galvanic couple with iron rebar, with the result that the rebar is rapidly corroded away, weakening the concrete structure. Concrete is alkaline, and it never really completely dries, so it acts as the electrolyte of the corrosion cell.
Gary
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snipped-for-privacy@bellsouth.net says...

Aluminum is lower in the galvanic series, so it's more likely the aluminum expands as it corrodes, stressing the concrete.
Ned Simmons
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Yep. Still remember the windows in our former embassy in Cuba, where steel screws had been used to attach aluminum. The more electronegative was eaten up to an inch clear away, leaving the screws to finally rust in the salt air while we were away.
That's why they galvanize instead of use lead paint under your car.
I'm going to bet, however, that the interior of the conduit has enough room for the developed aluminum oxide.
says...

wrote:
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On Thu, 08 Jul 2004 23:53:11 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote:

And it still rusts when in contact with wet concrete floors. Or wet ground
Gunner
"The entire population of Great Britain has been declared insane by their government. It is believed that should any one of them come in possession of a firearm, he will immediately start to foam at the mouth and begin kiling children at the nearest school. The proof of their insanity is that they actually believe this." -- someone in misc.survivalism
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I would think that the floor of a wood shop would be kept dry. Water is certainly going to hurt your materials long before it attacks EMT.
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writes:

keep
Aluminized, actually.
Harold
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says...

There may be aluminized the EMT, but I've never seen it. It's pretty obvious EMT is galvanized when you weld it.
Ned Simmons
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wrote:

Yup..you get that nasty yellow mang that grows on it...
Gunner
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It's galvanized, just with a thin coating. Usually electroplatd on rather than hot dipped.
Somewhere I have seen a chart that graphs the coating thickness in mils versus the life expectancy in years for normal and salt air exposure.
Harold & Susan Vordos wrote:

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conduit
but
is
I have seen it mounted on the floor and supported with Kindorf channel. It holds the conduit about 1 1/2 inches above the floor. It was to local code.
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