Electrical Breaker and dust collector question

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old wive's tale. you may have trouble getting another policy, especially once you get into the national insurance database, but there's nothing in current policies that states this.
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Use an amp meter to see if it pulls to much and something is wrong.
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Too much starting current. Wire them up so that the two items (both 115 volt?) are on different 15 amp circuits. It may take a bit of (safe) jiggery-pokery for the vacuum switch on one tool to start up the electrcity to the other tool (the dust collector motor which is wired to a different supply. I have exactly this set up, with a 230 volt table saw and then an arrangement to start up a 115 volt vacuum dust collector, which is not yet installed! Right now I can plug in a 115 volt window fan that then starts 'automatically' when the 230 volt bench saw is running. Naturally the 230 volt and the 115 volt supplies are on different circuits/breakers.
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How did you do that? There is only one "input" on the switch.
-Jim
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jtpr wrote: ...

The easiest fix is to return the one you bought for the remote starting switch...
http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?FamilyIDQ17&wcsX55&pcs úm
Alternatively, find one of the plug-in types similar to what you have but that has a start delay built in as well as stopping to eliminate the simultaneous starting surge or one that senses motor current from one circuit but allows the tool to be on another. If the one you have plugs into the saw outlet and the tool to be controlled plugs into it, it would be more difficult to modify. There are just current sensors w/ start relays that serve the other function.
My only recommendation on breaker changeout would be that should have run 30A service for shop circuit instead of 20A, but by Code that would be 10ga, not 12ga.
A longer time-delay is probably possible to find, but I'd venture it might be more expensive than the remote start option above.
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Something sounds like it could be wrong, I use a 1.5hp collector that recommends a 20 amp circuit, on 15 amp circuit along with a 15 amp router. Both coming on at the same time is a problem.
In answer to your question, there are slow blow breakers to address situations like this but I would still be cautious.
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Leon wrote:

There are also quite a few circuit breakers from a number of different manufacturers that have been recalled due to failure to trip when overloaded. Federal Pacific is one example:
http://www.inspect-ny.com/fpe/fpestlouis.htm
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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add a second breaker for the saw or dust collector.
have the auto switch trip a contactor, basically a large high capacity relaY.
END OF PROBLEM:)
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I wonder how Festool does that. IIRC my Festool Vac delays starting up a second or two after the tool that is plugged into it gets past its initial start up surge.
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Leon wrote: ...

It has a time delay.
--
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Yeah, about a second or two. I was wondering how they implement it.
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Leon wrote:

Most likely a count down circuit of some sort. When the first motor starts so does the timer. When the first motor is up to speed the count down reaches zero and fires the second motor start.
Dave
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It seem the OP's switch should have had this feature to start with.
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wrote:

You need a higher amp circuit, or plug DC and tabesaw into different circuits, or switch to 220v. My lights used to momentarily dim as I powered on the DC, but switching from 110v to 220v solved that. Plus, there are other benefits to 220v.
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Breakers are designed with different trip curves depending on the application.
Breakers designed for resistive loads will trip sooner than one designed to handle motor inrush current. Each manufacturer typically has three or four motor curves.
Find a local electrical supply and get a breaker rated for HVAC service.

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