Electric Hand planer

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On a different tangent, the last time my dad was down here for a visit he told me how he trued up the tablesaw arbor flange:
Squared the miter slots and blade. made a double track jig for his router with high speed diamond cutter (thank you Bell and Gosset).
Turned the saw on with no blade, then the router and feed on a screw feed to the flange.
My dad was a patternmaker in the Chicago area, he did job shops but ended up at IH R&D pattern shop which became JI Case.
I have a Unisaw, bandsaw, couple of benches. I have used that Unisaw since I was ten, it has shot a few things at me but never cut me (furious beating sound).
Mark
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I just clamped a lathe toolbit to the table and cranked the elevation handle.
wrote:

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On Thu, 19 Apr 2007 11:52:05 -0400, "Locutus"

It good for construction work (ie smoothing cuts for window sills) beveling a door, but use it somewhere that is easy to clean makes a lot of small chips fast. Snipe can be a problem at the end of a run too.
Mark
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I have a Makita which I use to relieve the back side of shop made wide door and window trim. I have used many times in rough framing construction. have a separate set of blades for that.
Chuck P.
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Thanks for feedback guys! The obvious use is using it for doors. Was curious if there was any use for it beyond that, doesn't sound like it. :)
I will keep the tool for occasion when I need it.
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sailboat with one. I suppose a drawknife was the proper tool, but the power planer had to be faster.
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I don't have (or want) a jointer. I buy rough lumber. I get joint quality cuts from my table saw but, the problem is to get that first strait edge. A power hand plane takes it down quickly and a couple strokes of a hand plane afterward makes it strait. Same goes for flattening a face before planing. The power planer does it quickly.

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I picked up one of these in a box lot of items from an auction a few years ago. I've used it for two things - planing doors and planing flat spots on bowl blanks for mounting on the lathe. If you now buy a lathe, your power planer is a multifunctional tool.
BTW, I soon gave up on using it to prep bowl blanks. Rather than hunt until I find the portable planer, I just stick the blank on between centers and square up the ends on the lathe for faceplate or chuck. (But don't read this second paragraph until you have the lathe.)
Regards, Roy

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While this isn't wood working, it can be used for shaping foam. I don't have an electric hand planer or work with foam, but I saw this being done in the Dirty Jobs episode "Sludge Cleaner" where custom surf boards were being made. Another interesting thing in that same segment was how the surf board shop had their lighting set-up, when planing the foam blanks, so the light would shine from the side and across the foam. This made it easier to find and see the spots that needed to be tweaked. That same concept seems like it would come in handy when doing finishing work on wood.
[1]: http://dsc.discovery.com/fansites/dirtyjobs/episode/episode_03.html
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On Thu, 19 Apr 2007 11:52:05 -0400, "Locutus"

I have an electric hand planer. I seldom use it. I have use it to flatten my work bench, to create a flat side of a log, outdoor projects. It is good for large pieces that can not be lifted onto a jointer. A large hand plane is a preferred tool, and much quieter.
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FWW #173 (Dec 2004) shows the author's method for flattening a rough slab about 3' x 6' for a table top using a power hand planer. Most stationary planer/jointers couldn't handle large sizes...
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Unless you are currently in the "trim carpenter phase" of your career, that tool has little use other than trimming a door down. Use it as a down payment on a real tool.
Locutus wrote:

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says...

I've got this 12'x4' slice of a pine tree here in my shearing shed. Would you like to come over and smothe it down and level it for me? ;-)
-P.
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