Edges on laminated glue up-how to trim?


I had to make a replacement piece of bent wood for an outdoor gate top and I made it from thin strips of White Oak glued up with Titebond III. Some of the strips did not line up when clamped and the edges need trimming to make them smooth. I was wondering if I could run one side twice through my jointer set at 1/32 or smaller and then trim the other side on the table or band saw. The bent piece has 90 degree bends at each end. I don't want to ruin a set of jointer knives and wonder if the glue up would hurt them. I also thought of using a carbide bit in my table mounted router with the fence set to trim up the sides.
Any experience/recommendations?
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Dustmaker wrote:

First, I'll note that white oak for outside application is a poor choice...it withstands weather very poorly although on top w/ no end grain showing it'll help some.
Otherwise, you're asking to tear up the workpiece by running thin cross grain over a jointer although there's no risk to the jointer from poly glues (unless you've left a tremendous glob).
Depending on how much overlap you have, there are three ways I'd approach the task.
1. Hand tools--sharp block plane or chisel will pare it down very quickly 2. For outside work such as that I would also reach for the belt sander 3. Last choice because it's more trouble to set up than it would take otherwise would be router w/ pilot bit.
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I beleive you're mistaken Red oak does not fare well. White oak does just fine.

That said plane or belt sander would be my joices as well. I would be a little mor concerned with loosing flesh than the edge on my jointer knives.
-Steve
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C & S wrote:

You're right...don't know why I said that against the white oak...
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On Sat, 15 Oct 2005 10:49:31 -0500, Duane Bozarth

White oak is an EXCELLENT outdoor wood.
I've used it for benches, window boxes, and exterior trim parts. Lots of truck decking is also made from lower grade white oak.
Are you thinking of red oak? That's not so hot when exposed to weather.
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Ba r r y wrote:

...
I had already posted the "mea culpa", thanks....
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On Sun, 16 Oct 2005 08:37:12 -0500, Duane Bozarth

Sorry I "piled on"! I didn't see the other replies until after I posted.
Since I've posted enough mistakes here to fit everybody, I understand. <G>
Barry
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The hand plane did the trick. Sometimes we get so involved in using power tools that we forget there are still hand tools.
I used a cabinet scraper to take off larger globs of glue and then took a bunch of shallow cuts with my Jack plane.
There were a few voids where the clamping did not bring the plys close enough. Filled them with solvent based wood filler and sanded with the belt sander. Now the piece looks so good I want to use it for furniture instead of putting it outside.
White Oak is the weather resistant wood and Tightbond III is the waterproof glue. A couple of coats of pigmented stain/sealer and I hope it's good for the next 25 years. After that, the next owner of this house can worry about it.
Thanks for the quick replies. I've been away from the newsgroup for a few months.
Dustmaker

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Dustmaker wrote:

...
Yeah, sorry--no excuse. Don't know what make me do that... :(
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