Edge banding router bits

Anyone using them?
I'm going to build a bookcase with plywood and want to trim the edges with solid oak. In the past I've used biscuits and glued them, but I've been thinking that it may be more accurate to use the router bits. I'm going to have about 30' of edge to do.
Infinity makes both a "V" and a t & g set. Whiteside has a V. Any preference if you do use them?
http://www.routerbits.com/cgi-routerbits/sr.cgi?1208579704_8650+400
http://www.infinitytools.com/products.asp?dept 00
Lee Valley has one that can be shimmed, but is far more pricier $129 http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&pP698&cat=1,46168
--

Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/



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Personally, I find that whole solid wood edge approach a waste of time. A quality edgebanding tape, of matching wood veneer, gives me the look and speed I want. Iron it on, sand and finish. Now, if it is going to be a shelf in a library or book store, okay then go for the solid wood edge..... in which case I'd go for the Infinity set-up. (Don't tell anybody, but I nail a flat strip on with a 23 ga pinner and let the glue do its job.)
Tape is my friend. I have posted this before, but it illustrates that one can get a satisfying finish with tape.
http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o290/Robatoy/Gunrack.jpg
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"Edwin Pawlowski" wrote:

SFWIW, either one increases the glue surface dramatically; however, getting that "just so" fit will probably be a problem.
Think I would make the solid oak edge pieces 1/16" oversize, then clean up with a pilot trim bit after glue is set.
Lew
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

I have no problems just gluing on a strip then trimming. Just as easy IMO as trying to fit a formed strip precisely.
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dadiOH
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Seems that there is no definite consensus or that the bit is "must have" item. I think I may hold off. The bookcase I'll be making is for my next door neighbor. He's going to supply the wood and I'll supply the labor. Good trade off as I've not had to start my lawnmower for the past three years and this assures it will be four.
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"Edwin Pawlowski" wrote:

The more I thought about this, the less I liked the router approach.
T&G edge banding begs for a decent table saw and a good dado blade set.
If you run the stock thru end for end, you insure the banding will be centered on the plywood.
It also is a lot faster on th T/S than using a router.
A dado has many mory applications than a special purpose router bit.
Just my thoughts.
Lew
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I've got the set from Burgess. Pricey ($120 if I recall correctly, 4-5 yrs ago).
The bits come with multiple shims and bearings, so the depth and width of cut can be finely adjusted. Good quality cuts, and the subsequent fit of the pieces is very good.
As far as the technique in general, I think the final result using an edge-banding system is far superior to a flat glue-up. Pluswhich, you can leave the edge piece thick, then mill different edges on it. I built a workspace for my daughter using 3/4" cherry ply and solid cherry edge-banding, and used an oval bullnose on the edges to make them a bit softer.
Usual disclaimers apply.
-Zz
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