Easing the edges

To ease over straight edges, simply clamp a piece of sandpaper to your bench and pass the edge over the paper, changing the angle each time. Three or 4 passes later, and you've got a simple eased edge.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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On 1/26/2012 7:58 AM, Puckdropper wrote:

I have discovered Mirka Goldflex soft sand paper. I use 180 grit and sand the edges by hand. the soft foam backing reduces pressure on the edges so that they get a consistent eased effect. The paper is quite strong and not likely to tare.
http://www.mirka.com/en/Abrasives/Abrasives_by-Form/?productgroup=Sheets___1&product=GOLDFLEX-SOFT___29S
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On Jan 26, 5:58 am, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

I use a 1/16th round over wherever I can if I am making a formal piece. You would be surprised how much more elegant a piece looks and feels with that nearly imperceptible detail. Not an easy bit to find sometimes but I always have a 1/2" and 1/4" shank version around.
Also very easy to match using sand paper when you pre-round pieces that might lap for instance and you have to leave some undone near the joint and finish the round over after assembly.
I am always amazed how table legs go from a long square piece of sanded lumber to a beautiful furniture component as you apply that roundover to the 4 edges.
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On Jan 26, 5:58 am, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

...and for those of use who hate the sound of a router, a block plane applied before the final hand-sanding works nicely. ;~)
John
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Yes, I apply this method when doing less "formal" pieces or specifically to be a bit more anitquish or classical. I really try not to sand it out after. It is a great joy with a well tuned plane. Again, I think the eye percieves the difference. I believe if you had two identical pieces except for using these two round over methods, the planed version would look somehow more antique. The brain sees things we don't realize.
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I don't sand the round over either... just the flats leading up to it. I like the subtle faceted aspect of the planed corners.
Given that the vast majority of the things I make have their design roots in the 17th to mid 20th century the planed corners work out just fine. I feel no compulsion to overdo them. On the other hand, when I want a heavy round over I use my shaper. ;~)
John
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In article

I use Lee Valley's Mini Edge-Rounding Plane: <http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?pd284&cat=1,41182>
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Woodworking and more at <http://www.woodenwabbits.com

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Trouble with a plane for finishing is you catch an end of a grain and your piece is screwed.
--------------- "Dave Balderstone" wrote in message
I use Lee Valley's Mini Edge-Rounding Plane: <http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?pd284&cat=1,41182>
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I use a worksharpened low angle block plane set to a very thin slice and I never get a catch when using good technique even across grain.
I am curious about the edge roundover plane but not sure how you sharpen it?
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I think that's why they list the replacement blade prominently on the page. ;~)
It's that or invest in slips of various grits. I've got slips for small gouges with an inside bevel that would likely work for the round over plane as they come to quite a thin rounded edge. As I recall they are India stones. My Arkansas slips are larger and would not fit...
I wonder if a fine, small, needle file, or even a chain saw file, might work if carefully applied and the back deburred with a stone??
John
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On Fri, 27 Jan 2012 13:02:36 -0500, "John Grossbohlin"

How about wrapping a small dowel with 1600 grit w/d and scary sharpen it? 99 cents a sheet at the local True Value hardware.
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Ayup. If you really want scary, use a diamond paste...
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Maybe drill rod... that plane has a 1/16" radius cutter!
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No the blade radius is larger than that. 1/16 is achieved by adjusting the blade.
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On Jan 27, 10:57 pm, Dave Balderstone

Check out the Slick Planes too...carbide cutters I think. JP
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"John Grossbohlin" wrote in message
It's that or invest in slips of various grits. I've got slips for small gouges with an inside bevel that would likely work for the round over plane as they come to quite a thin rounded edge. As I recall they are India stones. My Arkansas slips are larger and would not fit...
I wonder if a fine, small, needle file, or even a chain saw file, might work if carefully applied and the back deburred with a stone?? =================================================================Take a piece of wood of the shape you want for a slip, spray with adhesive and stick the appropriate grit of sandpaper to it. Alternatively, take that same shaped stick and apply loose abrasive (valve grinding compound, ect. and go at it.
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