Dying red oak to match?


I am making a table out of 7 pieces of red oak. 5 pieces are kiln dried and have a pink color. 2 pieces are air dried and are pretty white. All the wood has been in my basement for over a year (presumably it is all the same moisture content) I will be putting minwax Spanish oak over all (to match everything else in the room).
Does the pink color have anything to do with kiln drying, or is it just variance between different trees? I can dye the white wood before staining to match the pink wood. Is a match today likely to hold up over the years?
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x-no-archive:yes
I have several red oak boards that are kiln dried. Alot of the boards vary in color from pink to red to white. My guess is it is just the wood and not the drying process.
Can you go over the wood with a mixture of bleach and water to lessen the difference? (I hear this will lighten the wood. I think I did it several years ago on an old piece of furnature I was re-finishing but cant remember how it came out.) Toller wrote:

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x-no-answer: yes

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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Toller wrote:

...
Some is owing to differences between trees, some is probably the difference between heartwood and sapwood (like the white in walnut except not nearly as pronounced). In oak the color isn't affected all that much in drying and rarely is red oak steamed as is walnut to cause the migration of pigment to minimize the color difference of the sapwood.
Undoubtedly it will have some variation as the stain reacts w/ the UV but probably won't become terribly mismatched. That, however, isn't possible to predict with certainty, of course.
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Have any scraps or cutoffs you can test with?
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Toller wrote:

Responses from this group would be
    1 DAWGS     2 Buy a book and read it     3 Take a freaking woodworking course
Good Day
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Darn clever! I bet you mumble when you talk, right?
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Toller wrote:

You can try to blend stains with a little yellow or pink for the pink part and try to minimize the difference. Don't remember a lot of red oak which is white (oak). Mixing and matching if fairly easy - do a test piece first - and covers a multitude of sins. Also, yellow or amber often will even out colors - often in oil based varnish or water based designed to mimic the oil base. Will water based dyes, you can make any color you want to blend regions. don't be afraid to try them. also, be sure and match the grain boards as well as possible to minimize contrast which, if you don't, will highlight any inconsistency in your boards.
mbr
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