Dust Collector outside?

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Hey all,
Just wanted to bounce this off you. I just got a Dust Collector for my garage shop. Unfortunately the only place in the garage to fit it is on the opposite side from where most of my tools are. So i started thinking I could build a small bump out on the side of my garage to house my DC. then i could just punch through the wall and shorten my runs. I would also quiet down the shop some.
My only question is, would it be better to then just vent the bump out to the outside, or put a filtered return back into the garage? Seems like the DC probably wouldn't suck that much air out of the garage so it would be a moot point.
danh
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the
Hopefully the DC is sucking boatloads of air ( > 600 CFM). I'd say have a filtered return to the garage.
This is discussed somewhere on this site. http://cnets.net/~eclectic/woodworking/cyclone/index.cfm People put DCs in another room and couldn't open the door while the DC was running because of the pressure difference. Putting a filter in the door was the solution, IIRC.
-- Mark
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Kinda depends on your locale. Mine's outside, but I'm in southern Arizona. In the summer, I run a swamp cooler that puts out a lot of air, so I'm not sucking out too much cool air to the desert. Tom >danh wrote:

Someday, it'll all be over....
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the
Your DC would not remove much air... Lets think about that! Typical two car garage, say 24 x 30 feet, 8 foot ceiling. Just a tad over 8,000 cubic feet of air inside. 1200 CFM dust collector. 8000cuft/1200 cfm 6.67 minutes to change ALL the air in the shop. Not a problem unless you plan on heating or air conditioning the shop! Greg
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I've been sitting on the side lines following this thread. I thought I would offer the following information to help determine the hourly cost to heat the air exhausted by a dust collector.
Assumptions: -Dust collector will exhaust approximately 1500 CFM (Based on 2 hp Grizzly spec.) -Outdoor air temperature is 10 degrees F, indoor air temperature is 70 degrees F. -However the air is being replaced, i.e., by leakage in structure, open window, etc. it will be heated to 70 dgrees by some heating device.
-The average efficiency of a gas fired furnace is 80% -A direct resistance electric furnace or electric baseboard is 100% efficent. -One CCF of gas contains 100,000 Btu's and cost $.70 (approximately) -One kWh of electricity contains 3,412 Btu's and cost $.09 (approximately)
The formula to calculate the heat required to raise air temperature is: Btuh (Btu's/hour) = CFM x (indoor temp - outdoor temp) X 1.08 Therefore: 1500 cfm X (70 - 10) X 1.08 = 97,200 Btuh (The heat required to raise 1,500 cfm of makeup air (10 degree outdoor air) to 70 degrees) (The 1.08 constant contains the conversion factors to convert CFM into Btu's per hour.)
If an 80% efficient gas appliance is used, 97,200 Btuh / (100,000 Btu/CCF X (80%/100)) = 121,500 Btu of gas will be burned to produce 97,200 btu of heat. 121,500 Btu / 100,000 = 1.21 CCF X $.70/CCF = $.847 $.847 is the hourly cost to replace the heat exhausted from one hour of operation.
If an 100% efficent electric appliance is used. 97,200 Btuh / 3,412 btu/kWh = 28.48 kWh 28.48 kWh X $.09/kWh = $2.56 $2.56 is the hourly cost to replace the heat exhausted from one hour of operation.
Hope this helps
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Helps me. This summer I plan to do something like that by putting the DC into another shed off the garage. I'll put a filtered return vent hole in the wall to get some of the heat back. Ed
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If you put in a filtered return, that is a differant story, no heat loss, no problem! Make is so you can block the return in the summer and just let it blow outside, it will move some air through the shop if you don't have AC! Greg
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snipped-for-privacy@firelands.net (Nemo) writes:
[...]

Do you get a big buyer price reduction? 25 (EURO)cents seems a much more likely number...
--
Dr. Juergen Hannappel http://lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de/~hannappe
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@physik.uni-bonn.de Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
  Click to see the full signature.
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Juergen Hannappel asks:

I don't think so. I think we're paying more than that in Bedford, VA...with fuel factors and such, it is 14 cents per KWH, according to the most recent bill.Some wide variations around the U.S., though, as you can see.
Charlie Self "Take care of the luxuries and the necessities will take care of themselves." Dorothy Parker
http://hometown.aol.com/charliediy/myhomepage/business.html
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On 15 Jan 2004 16:46:32 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) scribbled:

Canada is even cheaper. Here in the Yukon, in one of the highest priced areas in Canada (Only the NWT, Nunavut, and parts of Alberta are higher), the basic residential rate is 10.5 Canadian cents per kW-h. Quebec, Manitoba and BC are about 6 cents per kW-h, IIRC.
Luigi Note the new email address. Please adjust your krillfiles (tmAD) accordingly Replace "nonet" with "yukonomics" for real email address
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Juergen Hannappel wrote:

My last electric bill for Standard Residential service (200A) was US $61.80 for 898 kwh or $0.0688/kwh. Hard to say how the power is being produced, could be fossil fuel, nuclear, or Niagra Falls (hydro obviously). I live in NE Ohio. Other discussions have indicated that US$0.085/kwh is about average for the US and Canada.
ARM
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There are many good things about Europe, but energy cost is not one of them! My area is around $0.09. Wilson
Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869

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snipped-for-privacy@lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de says...

How much of your energy cost is taxes? How easy is it for energy providers to build powerplants?
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I agree with your numbers, but don't forget to add heat loss of the building to start with! If it takes 50,000 BTU just to heat your building you will need to add this to the numbers. Now if you do not have a large enough furnace to over come the heat loss, its gonna be cold in your shop! Period! Now all of a sudden you will need a 170,000 BTU gas furnace, or 150,000 BTU electric to maintain the temps in the building. I doubt few here have that large of heat source in their shop! You mention the cost to replace the heated air removed by the dust collector, sure it is not much, but if the furnace is not large enough, will not keep up with the heat loss, and you will be cold. You probably can get by with short bursts of use from your dust collector, but with long usage you better wear your thermal underwear! This is all easy to test. Just stick your dust collector out the door with a hose to the inside, and run it for a while, then decide which way you want to go! Greg
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Or as was mentioned in the archives: If you use fossil fuels for your water heater or furnace (I have natural gas in my garage), you would end up pulling the exhaust fumes into the garage because of the negative pressure. Not a good idea, so filtering it back into the garage in that scenario would be a must.
Mike

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Agreed. If you plan on putting the DC outside in the winter with gas or oil heat, you need to leave a window or door open for makeup air for the DC. Greg
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Wow,
I had no idea this thread would generate so much traffic.
My basic premise for the fact that the DC would not suck that much air out of the garage is this.
My DC is not like my air cleaner. The air cleaner gets plugged in and basically runs runs runs
My DC turns on when I use a tool. And turns off when done. Since most cuts probably take probably less than 45sec, that isn't all that much air.
Am I missing something? Do most people turn on their DC and run it the entire time they are in the shop?
danh

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a
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danh wrote:

I start my DC a few seconds before starting the tool and turn it off a few seconds after turning off the tool. With the electricity in this 1960's house, turning them on at the same time is likely to trip a breaker -- maybe even on separate circuits. <g>
When I had a bench saw, I could run the shop vac and the saw on the same circuit, and it didn't matter which was turned on first. With my 1.5 HP Griz contractor saw, if the shop vac is turned on and on the same circuit, pressing the switch on the contractor saw trips the breaker. That's why I have an extension cord along the ceiling from the laundry room to the shop. The TS gets its own 15A circuit from the laundry room when the washer is unplugged.
Gotta rewire this house from the panel up.
-- Mark
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It depends on the job at hand. I jointed and planed a pile of boards the other day. The DC ran for about two hours straight. I will also let it run if I am doing multiple cuts that require little time in between. Greg
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If venting to the outside it will also suck out all your heat.
Wendell

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