Dust Collector Hose for Delta Miter Saw?

I received my JDS Dust Force dust collector yesterday, got it assembled, and fired it up for the first time. I haven't even hooked it to a tool yet, but I'm already envisioning where to run duct work! :)
Unfortunately, I've already run into my first hurdle. I have a 10" Delta miter saw, and I've measured the port as 1-1/2" ID. Naturally, a 1-1/4" shop vac hose is too small, and virtually every adapter I've seen steps from 1-1/4" to 2".
Ideally, I'd like to run a short length of 1-1/2" hose (if I could find it) from the saw up to the wall, then adapt to the 4" main duct.
Any ideas where I can get a 1-1/2" hose to fit the saw, and an appropriate adapter to connect to the 4"?
Also, does anyone make rigid "antistatic" pvc pipes for duct work. I'd prefer smooth pipe over the flexible corrugated stuff, but no one seems to make it. I'd use regular PVC water pipe, but I've heard static buildup is a potential danger.
Thanks,
Anthony
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Why wouldn't you put the hose on the outside of the port? I would think sticking the hose inside the port would increase the risk of clogging and would make it tough to keep the hose actually connected to the saw.
-Nathan
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That would be my preference, but that measurement is even more odd. Something like 1-3/8" OD. I figured 1.5" would be an easier size to match?
Anthony
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Ooops. :) It's probably more like 1-5/8" OD. Gee whiz, I've been having a brain fart moment all day long... Best to stay away from the power tools today! :)
Anthony
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HerHusband wrote:

<snip>
The small ports are meant for shopvacs, not dust collectors. That small of a hose will choke a dust collector down to the point where doesn't work very well.
You're likely better off using a shopvac on the miter saw, or else making a shroud of some sort behind the saw to capture the dust, with a 4" fitting for the collector hose.
Static buildup is not a danger in a small shop. If it really worries you, just wrap some bare wire in a spiral around your plastic pipe.
Chris
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I was initially thinking a hybrid approach, a small hose connected to the port on the saw, Wye'd in to a full size port near the back of the saw for any dust that escaped.
However, now that I think about it, if I built a shroud of some type around the back of the saw, I could probably just angle the little "Ell" port on the saw towards the shroud. In theory, it should blow the dust back right into the DC hose. Hmm... Something to look into.
Like I said, I just received the DC and am like a kid in a candy store trying to figure out how to connect everything up. Most of my tools are mobile, so I have to keep that in mind also.
I'll probably run my duct up in the corner near the ceiling, and thought I would drill a hole in the overhead cabinets to pass the duct. Then I wised up and realized I could just move the cabinet over a few inches and make a filler to bridge the gap between cabinets. The duct would then drop down between the cabinets. Good reason to examine my options before I start cutting holes everywhere... :)
On a related note, my DC can be rewired for 240V if I wish. Since I plan to install an outlet dedicated to the DC, what advantages would running off of 240V provide compared to running off 120V? Lower amperage, but wouldn't the overall wattage be the same? I guess I don't understand the advantages.
Anthony
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wrote:

Yes, wattage would be the same - double the voltage, halve the amperage. The lowered amperage resulting in less voltage drop in the line is the only advantage. If your situation is such that the voltage drop to your machines is not significant with the higher amperage, then there is no real advantage. The longer the wire run to the machine, the more advantage to 240 volts.
However, if you are going to run a dedicated line to the DC, I would opt for running it as 240 volts since the line loss/voltage drop even in a short wire run will be less.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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I built a shroud around my 12" Hitachi miter saw and used a 4" dust collection port. While the enclosure helped to contain the chips and dust from cutting, it really did not help with picking up the cutting debris. While it gets some of it and contains the rest, the majority just settles on the bottom of the enclosure. I feel that his is due to the lack of vacuum to pull from such a large area. However, the shroud is a MAJOR improvement over having the clean up after every time using the saw. These miter saws spray chips and dust everywhere!
I am think of following the others suggestions of hooking a shop vac to the port on the saw.
Hope it works for you,
Ron

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Sears will start running big time sales on shop vacs right about now. The bigger the better for miter saws.
I got one two years ago for about $50 and it gets about 70% of the dust and chips.
Nothing will ever get it all at a chop saw...
dabears525 wrote:

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: Unfortunately, I've already run into my first hurdle. I have a 10" Delta : miter saw, and I've measured the port as 1-1/2" ID. Naturally, a 1-1/4" : shop vac hose is too small, and virtually every adapter I've seen steps : from 1-1/4" to 2".
I found a 1-1/2" to 2-1/2" adapter on Amazon, so I could hook my shop vac to my Dewalt 715 CMS. I found that even with the vacuum attached, a lot of dust gets sprayed over the wall behind the saw.
Someone had a web site where he described his home-made CSM workstation, and he had a enclosure behind the CSM lareg enough to allow full rotate and tilt. The enclosure caught the dust and was attached to his dust collector. Unfortunately, I can't find the site, now.
I'm planning to do the same sort of thig, one of these days.
--- Chip
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I used one of these with my Delta saw: http://www.houseoftools.com/product.htm?pid#886
Seemed to work ok, although I found hooking up and turning on the shop-vac to too much of a pain in the butt unless I was doing a lot of cutting.
Clint

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I struggled with this Delta chop saw problem too. I couldn't find an adapter that would go from 1 1/2" to 4" or any good combination of adapters that got me there. There may be one out there today. I ended up getting same adapter as Clint's from Ace hardware store. The one I bought isn't hard plastic, rather a somewhat rigid but flexible sort of rubber material and I just cut-out the section that goes from an I.D. of 2 1/4" to 1 1/2". Slipped 1 1/2" over the saw's port and clamped it with a 2" hose clamp. The other end fits the 2 1/4" O.D. shop-vac type of hose on my Fein vacuum. I really like this vacuum by the way. Bought before my dust collector. You plug the tool's 110 v cord into the electrical outlet built into the front of the vacuum and it goes on and off when you turn power tool on and off. Very convenient for sanders, hand routers, chop saw, etc. A little off topic, sorry. There is a little sawdust that doesn't get picked up by the vacuum on the chop saw, but minor in my view. Very little on the floor. Just a little on the back of the chop saw table mostly.. If you bought a shop-vac before your dust collector, that's all you really need in my opinion.. Good luck..

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HerHusband wrote:

Don't bother.
Miter saws are better with a large hood and 4" port.
Look at the second item on this page: <http://www.ptreeusa.com/mitersawaccessories.htm
Attach the large hood to an OSB or blue foam wall, and you'll do much better.
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I'd probably build an enclosure and use a 6" DC line. Most DCs are 6" anyway.. don't choke it down to 4"..
The enclosure would cover as much as possible.. and maybe have some pull out / adjustable sides or tops..
the goal is to get the the fine stuff that will kill ya.. the chips are harmless..
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Option 1: Resize PVC pipe to make a custom adaptor; see http://billpentz.com/woodworking/pvc.html
Option 2: Notice how badly designed the Delta 10" miter saw dust port is; sawdust is flung everywhere -except- in the direction of the port. You'll probably end up with a DIY hood, given the $25 price of the 'big gulp'. Something along these lines: http://www.forums.woodnet.net/ubbthreads/showflat.php?Number259574 . Maybe mock it up in cardboard and duct tape until you've verified that it works without interference in all angled positions of the saw.
David Merrill

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I picked up a plumbing fitting yesterday and see the dust port on the saw is just smaller than a 1-1/2" pipe. And a 2" plumbing pipe is about the same size as my shop vac hose.
I haven't tried it yet, but I think a "Fernco" style coupling would make the transitions. They're basically just a rubber connector with a band clamp at each end. I'm planning to pick one up the next time I run to town. It'll give me something to play around with... :)

Yeah, I don't have a lot of hope for the dust port, but figured it was worth a try.

Maybe. I'm still debating whether to even bother with dust collection around the miter saw. It would require a lot of duct work to make it happen, and from what I've read it's not very effective anyway.
Anthony
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Im purchasing a DC this week (the shop fox 2HP) and had planned on hooking it up to my RAS, there is a dust port on the blade shroud. I planed on going 6" from the DC and coming directly out of that to the little dust port (1-3/4? maybe 2").
Should I even bother?
It doesnt sound like it going to work very well. Although its only about 5 feet from the DC, and the DC will only be hooked up to the table saw and the RAS for a while.
All suggestions are welcome!
BadAndy
--
:: Clever Sig here ::

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Andy H wrote:

While you need something to suck on that, you really should construct a proper hood. Even a piece of plywood stuck up behind the saw with the DC hose stuck through a hole in it will cut down on the sawdust by a remarkable amount. The hose to the blade shroud though get dust that otherwise would likely not get collected.
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--John
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