Dust Collector and compressing dust into burnable logs

Page 1 of 2  
I happened to be in the bookstore and thumbed thru a book on workshops... I love to borrow ideas... I only found one.
In a large workshop they were compressing the DC's shavings and dust into compressed fire logs...
Anyone in a small shop have one on a small scale, or know where to get one?
Too bad Onieda doesn't link on that kind of tool from their website. I am empyting about 35 gal drum per week and would like to inexpensively compress them.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 12 Feb 2005 16:01:39 -0500, tiredofspam <nospam.nospam.com> wrote:

Haven't run across that, but one idea I saw in a magazine a number of years ago was to mix sawdust (chips in a DC should work just as well) with melted paraffin. Poured into coffee cans with a starting wick, this was purported to work well as smudge pots. Poured into bricks, it should work at a minimum as firestarters for fireplaces.
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ The absence of accidents does not mean the presence of safety Army General Richard Cody +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
doesn't link on that kind of tool from their website.

I wonder if a paper slurry can be mixed with chips and cast into logs. Compression would have to be very high to do with no binders. Something with a hydraulic cylinder could be made to work if you had the right mold.
One of our local wood suppliers ships his chips to Maine where a company makes pellets. The Woodcraft store gives/sells theirs to a horse farm where it is used for bedding.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
How about a 8" PVC pipe w/ a cap on the end.
Pour the dust in - make a "smasher" (think butter churn) and pour and mash. May need to add something to help make it stick together - the parrifin idea seems pretty good. then just unscrew the cap and push it out.
If you have a Hydraulic press (about 80bux at HF for the small 1)- Im sure you could come up w/ something.
Keep us posted.
"tiredofspam" <nospam.nospam.com> wrote in message

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Paraffin isn't too good if you plan to burn it in a stove. But to hold the stuff together you could try oatmeal or wheat paste. If you mixed it good, rammed it hard, and let it dry out, it would probably be pretty hard.
Rob V wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I am thinking probably a steel pipe. I think the pvc would blow out under the pressure. a harbor freight ram is a good idea.. .probably get other uses out of it too.
Rob V wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"tiredofspam" <nospam.nospam.com> wrote in message

Three options here. First would be to get a ram/press and feed wood chips and saw dust into a mold along with black (or log) wax available from refineries that use high wax content crude oil (San Jaquine Valley crude, aka SJV). The wax would be a byproduct and sold off.
Second, trade your wood chips and saw dust to a company that makes these logs (presto).
Third, feed sawdust and wood chips to an elephant. :o)
--

FMB
(only one B in FMB)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
FMB wrote:

How would you fit beachball sized logs in the fireplace? :)
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My father recently helped set up a plant up here in Canada that turns sawdust, wood chips, wax, and a little potato starch into molds, which are then turned into trapasoidal fire logs. I can get some of the details from him perhaps (like the ratios used), and find out what pressure is required to form the logs. It's pretty basic stuff, excluding the transport mechanisms required to churn them out at reasonably high volume. FWIW, they get about 3 to 4 hours burn time from a 3 pound log.
Clint
"tiredofspam" <nospam.nospam.com> wrote in message

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Finally we are getting somewhere. Is this a homemade system for the plant, or commercial? If commercial what is the name of the maker? Wax ... I would think wax would make a mess in the fireplace?
I am interested... seems to me that it is better than just carting the load upstairs to be put out for trash... I imagine my collectors hate getting a pile of dust in the face, I would like to reuse the stuff. I sometimes feel like putting the dust in the fireplace but am afraid of the flash from fine dust loosely thrown in.
Clint wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"tiredofspam" <nospam.nospam.com> wrote in message

at what proportion it is injected or if the chips/dust soak in it making a slurry and the excess wax is squeezed out during the pressing.
FMB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It's a commercial plant (i..e. it's making logs for retail sale), but built from scratch. They've gone through numerous revisions trying to get their processes to where they need them to be. Things like getting the logs at exactly the right weight, trying to get the wax/wood ratio right to get the burntime/cost effective, etc.
They don't use much wax in the mixture, I don't believe. It's by far the most expensive component of the logs, so they want to keep that to a minimum. Just enough to hold it together after it's been pressed. I don't think the wax causes any issues in the fireplaces, but I haven't tried one myself, as we have a gas fireplace.
I'll have to see what details I can give out based on their patents. I'll try to post back with some details. It's about time for my filial phone call, anyway.
Clint
"tiredofspam" <nospam.nospam.com> wrote in message

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
They should be real pleased that you wnt to give out details of their industrial project.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
That's why I said I would check before posting any details.
Clint

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ok, here's the scoop, as much as I can pass on...
100psi pressure (they use a hydraulic cylinder). The base of the mould is about 7"x7", so that's almost 5000 pounds of pressure 4 pounds of wax, shavings, "needles" (think toothpicks), and sawdust all mixed together. Approximately 40% wax. Regular candle wax or whatever should work fine. That's what they were using originally, till they started buying in bulk
Clint
"tiredofspam" <nospam.nospam.com> wrote in message

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I use my dust and shavings for the night time or in 'sleep' mode. Just cover your wood fire with the stuff and the fire stays 'in' all night, keeps the room warm. In the morning put on some kindling and a blow will light the fire again. The trick is to give up matches altogether.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'm not sure I understand. Won't the dust and shavings just burn very quickly... and be gone? It this in a fireplace or stove?
dzine wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 13 Feb 2005 11:00:33 -0500, tiredofspam <nospam.nospam.com> wrote:

Depend on the quantity and the hearth design. Shavings burn very quickly, but a reasonable quantity of dust packs down into a dense pile with little airflow, so burns very slowly. It's the dust pile that will stay in overnight.
OTOH, dust piles burn cold. You may see extra trouble with tar deposits in the flue.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A fireplace. Shavings burn quickly and dust glows slowly. So keep the shavings for the morning or whenever you need a quick burn. The dust restricts air so less combustion, works in stove too.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Many wood pellets, fireplace log, briquet are made with wood only and some use shavings only,no wax or other binders. These shavings have to be dry, broken in finer particles and pressed under very high pressure. Logs and briquets are usually made with hydraulic rams, pellets with rotary dies.
Eric

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.