Durable Exterior Finish

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Anything you do on doors, etc, has to match everything else. And if you do something different by making new doors, are you going to make new beams too. Not to mention taking out the old ones and installing the new ones.
At least with the doors, you can take them off and work on them. You won't be able to do that with the beams. Whoever did the work on the exterior wood really screwed this home owner. She was asking for a lot and should have been expected to pay for it.
My advise would be to just use the original wood and structures. That is what she paid big money for. And that is what she is trying to get back. To do something else doesn't take into account her heavy emotional investment into her castle.
And if you pull off a miracle and restore her dream, then you will be good to go on everything else. But is has to be really expensive. It sounds like you did a good job of explaining that to her. Now just follow through.
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I think you should not give up on the total picture fix. Find a good sandblasting company, that has experience with a wide range of blasting mediums. Get them out with a range of mediums to do a test, and see what works. I really believe that holds the answer to fixing the problem of unifying the finish in the nicks, groves and divots.
--
Jim in NC


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"Rob Hanson" wrote:
Okay, the saga continues, but this is where the opportunity gets to be fun.
I've posted a few pictures of the house in question, link below. They show not only the doors and beams that I've been referring to, but also the scale of the place. The client has put the beams on hold for now, waiting to see what I can do to the garage doors.
The underlying wood is mahogany. The wood was stained with a BenMoore oil-based penetrating stain which had walnut along with red and black. This stain has failed due to lack of maintenance. So far, all attempts to remove the stain with chemicals have failed. Not only that, but removing the stain via chemical is bound to cause issues... the house drains to a waterway. I was only able to get down to the wood by planing and sanding. (I have sample pieces in my shop.) The stuff underneath is beautiful... sheesh.
Considering how much manpower and noxious chemicals would be taken up in trying to remove the stain, sand, and start anew, I'm thinking of proposing that the client replace the garage doors, with me doing the finish on them. (Currently my favorite choice is the CPES and Epifanes mentioned earlier in the thread.) Overall, this would be a lot less time and effort.
Question is: If you could replace the garage doors with any readily available wood, what would you choose? Take a look at the pictures and see what you think would look best relative to the stonework on the house, as well as the beams staying dark as they are. I've got one species in mind, but would love to hear your opinions... ------------------------------------------ Got a refinery someplace within reasonable distance you can call?
Refineries have lots of tanks that need to be cleaned on a regular basis.
This work is done by outside contractors.
In the past, they have used both sand blasting and/or pressurized water.
Clean up is a problem for either sand or water; however, all is not lost.
Enter dry ice.
Today a lot of tanks are cleaned using dry ice pellets under pressure much the same way sand is used.
The pellets hit the tank wall and their low temperature helps fracture the crud thus helping to break it loose.
The other big advantage is that no sand or water contaminates the tank.
When the pellets warm up, they simply turn to gaseous CO2.
Might be worth checking out.
Lew
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On 11/09/2012 06:47 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

But, but, but - doesn't CO2 cause global warming?

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gospel of envy, its inherent virtue is the equal sharing of misery"
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"Doug Winterburn" wrote in message
On 11/09/2012 06:47 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

But, but, but - doesn't CO2 cause global warming? ======================================================No.
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"Doug Winterburn" wrote in message
On 11/09/2012 06:47 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

I agree about using dry ice. They use dry ice sandblasting to get rid of mold etc in houses and it works quite nicely.
You may ant to try it on a hidden area like the back of a grage door etc.
See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dry-ice_blasting Aslo search for "dry ice blasting wood" http://www.google.com/search?q=dry+ice+blasting-wood
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