duh..like now what

stupid question for idiot action...was gluing on plywood edging (ash strip, flush to side of plywood)..thought, hm, I'll tack it on with 23 gauge pin nail and then rip it even after it dries..did not remember that the front face of the edging strip is NOT SMOOTH, so now I need to rip the face of the edging strip with the pin nails in the strip..duhhhhhhh
Q: if I don't care about the blade (old Oldham rip blade) can I just rip through the 23 gauge pins without a safety issue. Woudl finish up with sanding. Blade life not an issue - on verge of pitching anyway. Normally would use router but that is out. What do you think?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
cc wrote:

Not a problem. Take it from one who has cut off a few 6d headless finish nails.     dang it!!!     jo4hn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I would feel better if the blade was nice and sharp rather than dull. A 23ga nail is easily cut, but if the blade is dull, it might tear away.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Do you have a pin sized counter sink that you can use to drive the pin nails deeper?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message ...

Tim w
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Very often easier said than done. Better pins are coated and will most often break before coming out.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Been there, done that. You may see a tiny spark now and then, but the blade will hardly know the nails are there. Since you have to cut through the nails anyway, why not take off enough of the edge that you can replace it with a smooth strip?
DonkeyHody "Every man is my superior in that I can learn from him."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 27 Dec 2007 02:31:34 -0800 (PST), DonkeyHody

No need to replace the strip.
23 ga. headless pins can be made truly invisible. They really are THAT small, far smaller than a brad!
To the OP: Use a sharp blade! There is a small chance a dull blade can pull on the wire and elongate the hole. The fact that yours are installed in ash will make them easier to cut.
I've unintentionally hit 18 brads and staples, and even _15_ gauge finish nails in jigs, and they were cleanly sheared off. The 15's made more noise and dinged a tooth or two, but 18 and 23 ga. fasteners shouldn't hurt anything.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Reading this thread has made me LMAO. I thought I was the only one that deliberately (OK, maybe no deliberately sometimes!) wound up buzzing through a brad or pin.
If I am stuck and HAVE to do it, I will after some good cussing. Yet, I am always kind of embarassed, even when no one else is around.
I would vote for the sharp blade idea myself.
I had a piece of 1 1/2" oak clamped to my old steel miter setup a couple of years ago and was making a small rip down the side of the board. It was old and hard, but I was using a 15 amp Makita with a new 18 tooth Makita blade on it, so I didn't think twice.
I heard a kind of loud rattling noise, but I thought I hit a hard knot I didn't see as the saw didn't bobble, and I didn't see any sparks or smoke. I felt something hit my foot, but I didn't want to mess up my cut (no more oak) so I finished it. Looking on the ground when I set the saw down, I discovered I had cut off a 3/8" steel clamping knob, cutting through the plastic end and shearing off the bolt. Talk about feeling stoooopid (and embarassed!).
No apparent damage to the blade or the saw, although I did find little tiny sparkles of metal in the wood. It was a brand new blade and it didn't even lose a tooth, warp, or burn.
Yeah, I'd go with a sharp blade. Especially for something that small. You'll want a clean cut!
Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Snip
I too have done this more times that I would like to admit. The first few times I was unaware that this had happened except for the beautifully polished spot about 1/16" in diameter.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I hope you pointed out to anyone that saw your polished spot "it's a shame that it won't be where anyone could see it. It took me a long time to get that polished up"
Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

LOL ... funny how you can embarrass yourself, even when you're all by yourself. :)
Of course I have no idea how it got there, but one day the aluminum fence for my Woodhaven miter gauge developed a nicely executed, angled cut clean through it. It would now make a super "zero clearance" fence for a 6 3/4 degree angle ... providing I ever need to cut something at that angle again.
.... I did decide that it was probably time to take a break for the rest of the day before I hurt myself.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 12/14/07
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Swingman wrote:

And once embarrassed to further the shame by sharing it here......I've done two as of late....a shallow 3 inch slice through my cast iron Table saw top, you'd think 2 by 4's draped across it when cutting ply on top with a skill saw would make that near impossible, round blades apparently elongate when spinning quickly<G>. And a quick slice(length wise) through a sheet rock screw(a cobbled together jig) with my Forester blade, normally only used for finish grade type projects....neither incident seemed to do significant harm but I haven't really cut much since with either blade either. Rod
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well, that made me fall out of the chair with laughter. How well I know that feeling.
"Hi, dear... you're home early."
"Uhhh.... yeah... well... the material didn't get to the job like it was supposed to".
Yeah, right.
About that time I am thinking, "ten toes, ten fingers, no blood. I guess the day wasn't THAT bad." Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:
...

Ditto what the others have said, but if you're really worried about cutting steel with your saw blade you could always get one of these:
http://www.hawksawblades.com/sawblades-morse-metaldevil.htm
Believe it or not, they work quite well. I've cut strips off 3/8 steel plate with my PC circular saw using one of these blades.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Dec 27, 12:55pm, Tom Veatch wrote:

It's all about feed rate.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.