Dual fences?

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The front of the blade nips you. The heel pulls you in and shreds you.

Keep your hands away from the blade.

Birch ply has an excellent low traction surface if sanded to 220 and finished with two coats of wipe on poly. Workpieces are easily slid into place, and stay in place under hand pressure.

Reaching across the blade.
Don't force us to repost that bandsaw jpg.

The only thing to worry about being his is you. Stand to one side of the blade.
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Reaching across the blade.
Again, no.
when you are ripping a piece of 2' x 8' plywood and it is half through.
Some times you walk around to the other side of the saw and you pull the sheet through.
Are you then reaching across the blade?
This is what I am attmpting to describe.
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4' deep outfeed table.

You need someone to show you how to use a tablesaw.
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On Sat, 2 Feb 2008 20:03:30 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

Yes, I do stand to the side.
My high school shop teacher was a room monitor. I do not recall any teaching but that was over 30 years ago. I do recall the college shop teacher teaching but I do not recall any lessons besides pull down on the disconnect handle mounted 14 feet up on the ceiling before servicing equipment. Oh, he also said no power sanders allowed. I do not recall a lesson on the use of scrapers. One last lesson from the college instructor. Two parts. Do not drop tools on the floor. Do not stick your foot out to prevent a chisel from hitting the floor. Better the floor and teacher wrath than a trip to the hospital.
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Jim Behning wrote:

Lucky you. At least you knew what "sharp" was like. Wasn't until I started doing my own sharpening that I found out that you don't try to catch a chisel with your foot.

--
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--John
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Sun, Feb 3, 2008, 11:00am snipped-for-privacy@cox.net (J.Clarke) doth sayeth: Lucky you. At least you knew what "sharp" was like. <snip>
It's all relative. I took shop starting in the 4th grade, mandatory until the 8th grade. I took 4 years of it in high school, where it was optional. Started using power tools, unsupervised, in th grade. The wools were demonstrated, and then we were expected to se them right, and not hurt ourselves. We listened, and no one sufferred injuries that a bandaid wouldn't fix. Except for the idoot jock that was horseplaying and shoved an arm thru the shp door window, cutting an artery - he survived. We learned woodworking, welding, some mechanics, drafting, forging, sheet metal work, metal lathe and milling machine, and even a big of electricity, and probably one or two things I don't recall just now. However, I graduated high school in 1958, age 17. Oh yes, attended schoo in two different small countryschools, in the same school distric, in rural southern Michigan. .
JOAT - who does not welcome thread question e-mails..
10 Out Of 10 Terrorists Prefer Hillary For President - Bumper Sticker I don't have a problem with a woman president - except for Hillary.
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Lucky you. At least you knew what "sharp" was like. <snip>
It's all relative. I took shop starting in the 4th grade, mandatory until the 8th grade. I took 4 years of it in high school, where it was optional. Started using power tools, unsupervised, in th grade. The wools were demonstrated, and then we were expected to se them right, and not hurt ourselves. We listened, and no one sufferred injuries that a bandaid wouldn't fix. Except for the idoot jock that was horseplaying and shoved an arm thru the shp door window, cutting an artery - he survived. We learned woodworking, welding, some mechanics, drafting, forging, sheet metal work, metal lathe and milling machine, and even a big of electricity, and probably one or two things I don't recall just now. However, I graduated high school in 1958, age 17. Oh yes, attended schoo in two different small countryschools, in the same school distric, in rural southern Michigan. .
I was 22 years behind you but I remember being taught all that stuff. It's a lot of the reason that I'm a toolmaker today...I was taught how to love the actions needed and how to DO the actions...or at least how to fake them well enough to get the job done.
I still have the center punch that I made in the forge part and also the ashtray that was cast during the foundry part.
Could you imagine the hue and cry that would go up if parents found out that an ashtray was made WITH TAX DOLLARS??????
Mike
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Sat, Feb 2, 2008, 2:41pm snipped-for-privacy@doesthisblockpork.mindspring.com (JimBehning) doth sayeth: <snip> You now have two pieces of wood that you are trying to safely pass by the saw blade. <snip>
I've read, and re-read, that, and still can't figure out what you're tryping to say. You've got ONE piece of wood, with two fences or one, until the blade passes thru the last of the wood. If you're using a push block, either way, I see no problem. O a push stick. Either way, if the board is sufficiently long, it will tip up away from the blade. Ahhhh, you guys argue about it, I don't really care. If I felt it would be useful, I would have qualms about using two fences. But, I don't, so I don't., too many other options to choose from that I would prefer to use.
JOAT - who does not welcome thread question e-mails..
10 Out Of 10 Terrorists Prefer Hillary For President - Bumper Sticker I don't have a problem with a woman president - except for Hillary.
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On Feb 3, 11:21 pm, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

If there is only one fence then the kerf can open up on the outfeed side of the blade. With two fences it cannot, so that greatly increases the chance that it will pinch the blade as stresses are relieved in the wood being ripped.
With a fence and a half, wherein the half fence ends just shy of the blade the kerf can open up, but the half fence will not hold the stock as tightly against the full fence as would a featherboard.
--
FF

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NO!!!!! HORRIBLE IDEA!!!!!!
You're begging for binding, kickback, and all kinda' bad things.
Make a sled with hold-downs.
-Zz

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Rockler has a similar set up on its cove making jig. I really don't see the purpose on that jig but the fences you are talking would have to be perfectly parallel, "perfectly". If they were not perfectly parallel there would either be no purpose of the extra fence or the fences would pinch the stock.
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Actually, I have a homemade sled that is almost perfect for my needs.
The homemade fence quickly locks to the sled with a pivot clamp and it happily sits vertical and it is parallel the blade.
Since I know how easy it was to make, I can make another one fairly quick.
My sled has a forward stop for safety.
It will always stay parallel to the table and it uses underside slides to prevent tilt and lift-off when fully extended.
My intention is to employ hold downs and a push handle far from the blade.
Like a deli slicing machine!
I will forget about the dual fences.
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On Sat, 2 Feb 2008 15:59:39 -0600, "Leon"

Cove cuts are not through cuts. Cuts that aren't through don't get the same pressure against the rising teeth.
Think crosscut dadoing with stop blocks. You can use the stops for dadoing, but the same stop in a full crosscut is an invitation to disaster.
I've done coves with one and two fences, and prefer two when the angle is such that the wood wants to walk away from the fence. I can take a slightly deeper cut with two rails.
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Yeah.. put your head between your knees and kiss your ass goodbye..
You would be almost forcing kick back, IMO.. Feather boards work because the have flex in them and let things move in one direction.. A fence on each side of the work would let the piece of wood being cut move either to the back or FRONT of the table..
Also, most folks only use feather boards before the blade... I think a 2nd fence might close the kerf and cause kickback, but not sure..
All in all, it sounds dangerous..
mac
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wrote:

If you don't believe all of the other posters who described terrible kickback, please film the tests.
Trapped wood is never a good idea on a table saw.
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Stu, Like others have mentioned, dual fences would be hazardous when used for ripping on a table saw but you can run paralle fences when making cove moldings on the TS. In this instance, the fences are not in line with the blade and you are not performing a through cut. Also, a hold down is highly recommended. Just wanted to mention that there is a variation of a two- or parallel - fence set up on a table saw. Marc
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DANGER DANGER Will Robinson Kickbacks ahead!!!!
--
Mike
Watch for the bounce.
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you are BEGGING for a kickback. The wood will not travel evenly between the fences, hang up, hit the blade, rattle around before it comes out at you. Hene the advice, NEVER us a fence and miter block at the same time.
make a crosscut sled - you'll be much happier.
shelly
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On Feb 4, 7:23 pm, snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net wrote:

The fence(s) are ON the crosscut sled!
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BoyntonStu wrote:

You don't need *anything* to prevent kickback on a crosscut sled. It's not an issue at all.
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