drywalling shop

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Probably. It may prove to be a very bad idea, but at least I'll be able to move any mounted tools about at will.
Updates in 12 months.
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Gee, your code calls for EMT inside walls of a finished area? Anywhere else, it's considered fire-safe to put sheetrock over Romex.
Anyway, drywall is good except for load-bearing mounts, so consider a couple of rails of wood or other trim horizontally at (for instance) bench and eye height. You could use Unistrut/Superstrut channel for this, too (and it'd be a handy way to clamp your surface electrical boxes). When you want to mount a heavy item to the wall (pegboard o'hammers!) just clamp into the unistrut or screw into the (clearly visible) wood rail.
Also, since you have high ceilings, consider putting a couple of sturdy boxes on the ceiling, with dangling sockets-on-a-cable. When some new tool goes into the center of the shop, this lets you plug it in without any tripwires on the shop floor. Twistlock sockets are preferred. I've seen some areas with island workstations connected this way, it's neat!
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whit3rd wrote:
> Gee, your code calls for EMT inside walls of a finished area? > Anywhere else, it's considered fire-safe to put sheetrock over > Romex.
The NEC applies everywhere except Chicago, where what is known as "Hogan's code" is in effect.
If you supply equipment to Chicago, you factor "Hogan's code" into the price.
At least that's what used to be the case.
Lew
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To be honest, I've never heard it referred to as "Hogan's code", but from other discussions I've read here and elsewhere, the residential electrical code around here has to be just about the most strict in the country. I've always assumed the rules are in place to protect union electricians. Every time I see a home improvement show where people are running Romex, I think "yeah, that would be easier".
todd
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todd wrote:
> To be honest, I've never heard it referred to as "Hogan's code", but from > other discussions I've read here and elsewhere, the residential electrical > code around here has to be just about the most strict in the country. I've > always assumed the rules are in place to protect union electricians. Every > time I see a home improvement show where people are running Romex, I think > "yeah, that would be easier".
You may not have heard of Hogan. More than 30 years ago he was chief electrical inspector for the City of Chicago.
Among other things, he would not permit molded case c'bkrs (100A-1200A) to be used in panelboards, everything had to be switch and fuse which meant 600A max.
Gives a whole new meaning to electrical distribution design.
I had customers who sold equipment with large electrical motor control panels to Chicago area customers.
Most of those control panels would not meet Hogans without a complete redesign which just wasn't work it.
The solution was "The Bull", AKA the UL bullseye.
Use all UL listed devices, then bring in an electrician from a UL listed control panel builder, pay him $100 to connect one wire and then attach the UL Bullseye.
All very legal and it solved a problem since Hogan accepted UL listed equipment.
At the time the whole process seemed so "Chicago", pay the graft and get the job done.
Lew
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Don't worry, Lew. They've cleaned all of that up. No more shady stuff like that in the city anymore. Riiiiight.
todd
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todd wrote:
> Don't worry, Lew. They've cleaned all of that up. No more shady stuff like > that in the city anymore. Riiiiight.
And if you think I believe that, we should get together and talk about some swampland over in Arizona.
As the used car dealers in Florida used to say, "Son, step right in and let me show you a couple of clean northern cars we just got".
Lew
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Nah, what they try to sell you here in AZ is the opposite of a swamp - a lot where there is no local water utility, you have to truck in your water, no sewers, and the soil doesn't perc, so you have use an "alternative septic" system. If you're lucky, you get electric and phone to the lot line.
Don't laugh, developers in NW Arizona are filing plans for developments close to where the new Hoover Dam bypass is going to be, where the water supply will be "truck in your own". They expect to sell a lot of less expensive houses to people who are tired of Las Vegas real estate prices and don't mind trading the commute for a cheaper house.
Jerry
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