drywalling shop

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That doesn't mean it's a good idea. The owners of those nice shops are asking for trouble.
B A R R Y wrote:

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Mike Berger wrote:

Even Norm has wooden shop walls. <G>
Seriously, though... Finishing area walls would probably be best covered with fireproof material. Even a relatively clean shop is going to have shavings, scraps, dust, and stored stock. Possibly enough fuel to make the actual wall covering irrelevant during an unattended fire.
I'll agree that it's not work losing sleep over. If the hazards of a wood wall covering bothers you more than drywall, than drywall it should be.
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todd wrote:
> Although I didn't highlight it, I'm curious to get people's input on > the electrical. One thing to keep in mind is that here in the Chicago > area, I've got to run everything in metal conduit, so running wire > inside the walls isn't quite as easy as drilling some holes and > pulling romex through.
Ah yes, the infamous Chicago code.
You can run BX in the walls. It is flexible, metal armored cable.
Ability to run conduit not required.
Yes it is more expensive than romex, but you are only talking about one room.
Buy it by the full box, from an electrical supply house.
Buying cut lengths of wire is a good way to go broke in a hurry.
Try working up a total electrical package (BX cable, boxes, wiring devices, etc) and giving it to an electrical supply house.
Might get a package price.
Lew
Lew
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Per our local amendment: "All new interior electrical installations shall be piped in rigid or EMT or (minimum) 1/2" Greenfield whips up to 6'0" as needed. (BX armored cable is not permitted).".
So, no replacing the bulk of the conduit with Greenfield or any other flexible conduit.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:
> Per our local amendment: "All new interior electrical installations > shall be piped in rigid or EMT or (minimum) 1/2" Greenfield whips up > to 6'0" as needed. (BX armored cable is not permitted).". > > So, no replacing the bulk of the conduit with Greenfield or any other > flexible conduit. >
The ghost of Hogan is still alive and well I see.
Got any buddies that are in the electrical business?
Lew
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Mike Berger wrote:

That's being paranoid to a fault. In a frame building, the wall surface itself is pretty immaterial.
If one is really concerned w/ a fire hazard in a shop, the most important areas are a fire-resistant storage area for flammables and passive sprinkler systems plus detection systems ideally connected to local responder.
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Last time I did the walls in my shop I used OSB. Fairly cheap but provided a lot of wall space without having to look for studs when hanging things up. run your wire on the outside in a conduit and it should be a snap.
Thom

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My 2 cents.
I echo what Lew said. Plywood, T&G, even wafer board. We did our garage in drywall a few years ago, stuck in a bunch of circuits in, etc, for all the power tools. We even air conditioned it, so it is actually a shop, not a garage.Only vehicles ever in it were during the hurricane a couple of years ago (stacking power tools to make enough room was NOT fun).
Drywall was a mistake. I will have some sort of solid siding for the next (and last) shop. This will be the ultimate shop, as I intend to spend my retirement in it. The cost will be a bit more than with drywall, but since I expect to use it for another 20 years, it will be worth it. Nothing fancy, but someplace with all the wiring hidden, and white painted ply or T&G or wafer board so I can hang something where ever I darn well please. I do this with the current shop, but sometimes it entails head scratching and finding the darn stud sensor.
Regards, Roy

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*snip*

If I was hanging things on a regular basis, I'd probably find a couple studs and discretely mark their location on the wall. (Up near the cieling or down near the floor. Just a 1/2" line on each side of the stud gives you something to go off of, especially if you know your stud spacing's consistent.)
Wonder if we could get an issue of some magazine like "Better Homes and Gardens" to publish a room where blue chalk lines 16 inch on center are part of the decor. :-)
Puckdropper
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To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
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I'm in the process of finishing up my new shop. At the suggestion of a local contractor (cousin through marriage), I covered the interior walls with OSB (oriented strand board) smooth side out.
The 7/16" OSB was about half the price of 1/2" drywall at the local borg. With a little care, the seams tend to disappear after painting. For the one or two seams that were a little stubborn, a some paintable caulk before painting took care of them.
Well, that's what worked for me, anyway. The added benefit is that I don't have to worry about poking boards through the drywall.
Joe
aka 10x
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I don't know what all the fuss about drywall is. Every shop I have had was drywall and the next one will be too. No problems hanging anything on the walls since the invention of the stud sensor. I have a couple friends that put up wafer board. It took tons of primer to seal it, and the glues and resin still sneak through in places. Plus drywall is a bit quieter than wafer board. It seems to me their shops echo the noise off the walls more than mine, Greg
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I'm with Greg.
I have drywall and I like having a "finished" space to work in. I *know* that my studs as 16" O/C because I put them there. They are easy to find because they are on one side or the other of every outlet... thre wraps of the knuckles and I know exactly where a stud is.
-Steve

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I did my shop with drywall. Since it was not an occupied space and separate from the main house, I used 3/8" drywall all around to make the job a little easier. However, check your codes, mine allowed it.
Ceiling first so that you don't have to match up to any crooked walls and probably takes movement without cracking better. Make a couple of T-bars, or rent a lift.
Horizontal actually easier, in my opinion, you can rig some step on lifts to close the seams, simple levers on blocks, although they sell or rent some devices that do that. I like working that horizontal seam four foot high, easier than working a lot of top to bottom seams.
Why would you not put the electrical in first?
The drywall was primarily to seal the insulation. After finished I installed a bunch of framed sections of perf board to hang stuff on. The drywall has held up well, despite my propensity to swing boards and tools into it. Haven't punched any holes yet.
This from an individual who hates floating drywall but can do it when necessary.
Frank
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rec.woodworking:

Pegboard is light, easy to handle, and convenient. If you need to get behind it, you just remove the mounting screws.
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Steve B.
New Life Home Improvement
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I'd stick with drywall. If you do poke something through it, it is easy to patch. Also provides more fire protection than OSB. Also less flamable surface to catch on fire to begin with. Take the time and do the electrical first. That way it won't be in the way when you want to hang cabinets, etc. Horizontal on the walls is better, IMHO. Just to make things a little more complicated, some people use double thick drywall. The outer sheet is glued to the inner sheet so there are no fasteners. I'd do the ceiling first. I get the feeling that you want to get the walls done so you can move in sooner. That means you'd have to move out to do the ceiling.
Pete Stanaitis ---------------------------
todd wrote:

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Hi Todd,

As other's have mentioned, your options are basically drywall, plywood, or T&G boards.
I wouldn't suggest pegboard over bare insulation, since there would be lots of holes leaving the flammable vapor barrier exposed. I doubt it would meet code if you ever had the house inspected (for selling, or whatever).
The nice thing about drywall is it's forgiving. If your cuts are less than perfect, or your walls are out of square, you can fix it all up during the taping stage. It's also a lot easier to fix later if you need to cut a hole and patch it later, or if you relocate some shelving and need to patch the screw holes left behind. Regardless of what you install, you WILL damage it at some point, so repairs are something to consider.
I used T&G for many of our ceilings, more for the appearance than the strength or durability. It's less likely to be damaged on the ceiling than it would be on the walls. However, you might want to check your local codes. Many areas require a layer of drywall under T&G paneling, so you might just be doubling your costs.
Also, keep in mind you can cut holes for electrical boxes or to fit around beams or other projections easily in drywall. Just a utility knife and/or a handheld drywall saw. If your measurements are off by a 1/4" or so, you can patch it up during the taping stage. With T&G and plywood, you'll have to be a lot more precise with your measurements and cuts. A "mistake" will be there forever, or you'll have to recut a new sheet.
As for hanging things on the wall, most items like shelves or cabinets will span more than a couple of stud bays anyway. Just use a studfinder to locate the stud to screw the item to the wall. For smaller items (sawhorses, extension cord reels, etc.) I like to make "racks" (kind of like custom made coat hangers) and screw the rack to the wall, then hang my items on the rack.

My wife and I drywalled our 24x28 garage, as well as all of the walls in our house. It's really not that hard once you've hung a few sheets. I prefer screws over nails, every 6" around the edges, and every 12" in the middle of the sheets (into the studs, of course).
Oh, and some drywall is white on both sides... :) Put the side with the tapered edges out. :)
If you're installing more than a few sheets, I recommend contacting a drywall supplier and have them deliver. Drywall is heavy and they can deliver it right into the room you're working on. Sure beats loading it onto the cart at the home center, loading it in the truck in the parking lot, and unloading it when you get home. Unless you want the exercise, save your strength for hanging the drywall. You can usually get lower prices by buying in volume too.

I've done it both ways and haven't noticed much difference. The theory is the wall sheets help support the ceiling sheets. But with a 24'x28' ceiling, there are lots of edges that aren't supported by the walls. I think the more important issue is proper backing. Before you hang the walls or the ceilings, install blocking anywhere you think you'll need to screw up a sheet of drywall (or nail T&G, or plywood).

We hung ALL of our drywall vertically. I personally think it results in a stronger installation, since all drywall edges are supported by studs and top/bottom plates. It makes taping a little more interesting, climbing up and down the ladder, but we hung 14' sheets vertically in our house and it wasn't that big of a deal. Climb the ladder, tape the upper half, then come down and tape the lower half. You have to climb up to hit all the nail holes and the corner joints around the ceiling anyway, so it's not that much difference.
The primary advantage of the horizontal approach is it results in less "waviness" as you look across a long stretch of wall. You also don't end up with any seam bumps when hanging cabinets or shelving. But like I said, we did all our sheets vertically, and didn't notice problems with either of those issues.

It would be better to run the electrical in the wall, as any exposed conduit is going to collect dust, get in the way of installing cabinets and whatnot, and be more vulnerable to damage. But, since you've already insulated, it may be too late to consider that.
You mentioned you are required to have conduit in your area. Is PVC conduit allowed? It's easy to work with, and non-conductive. You could install the conduit in the walls now, and put the actual wiring in later when time and money allows.

With proper backing for the sheet edges, no big deal at all.

Not a problem at all.
Have fun!
Anthony
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Find a source for 3/8" roughsaw plywood siding. It goes by the name "roughtex" in some circles. This makes an excellent and tough wall for a shop.
You can paint it, but it looks find left natural.
T&G pine is also another method but it's slower to install.
I would surface mount ALL electrical in conduit. I used plastic conduit and stranded wire. Much easier to deal with and it goes up quick.
todd wrote:

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Todd,
I put up drywall, but that is your call. I suggest that for lighting, be sure and consider track lights over where you think your tools will be. If you add more power tools you can add to your tracks and put light exactly where you want it. I used halogens over the work bench and finally I could read my dimensions even in winter when it was dark outside.
I also suggest you do the ceiling first. I like the idea of OSB. I used drywall and used pegboard liberally. I hate having to look for a tool and know I have it but can't find it.
Bill in New Mexico
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I found a reasonable source for slatwall on craigslist and will be using that to surface my shop when it gets finished in a couple of months. It's normally exorbitant when compared to drywall. With the craigslist deal it was merely expensive.
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Slatwall??
Isn't that stuff the ultimate dustcatcher?
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