Drywall ceiling

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I'm adding dry to my ceiling that is plaster and lathe. The joists go from right to left, the sheets will go from front to back. My thinking is that you should add strips ( I have to add them because the ceiling droops in one spot, so I'm leveling the whole ceiling) across the joints so when mounting the drywall you can screw into the joists and in between the joists ( to help the seams stay more rigid). What is the best (proper) way to place the strips and drywall compared to the joists TIA
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"noreaster" <noreaster1athotmaildotcom> wrote in message

The proper way is to take down the plaster and lathe and then attach the drywall to the ceiling joists directly.
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That's the way to do it. And it's lath, not lathe. A lathe is that "spinny" machine... know what I mean?
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I know about the shiny spinny thing, I wasn't sure about the plaster path spelling
wrote:

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If he has a lathe on the ceiling, it *really* needs to come down before the board goes up. <grin>
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I have started taking down the plaster in the dining room ( I stopped work in the living room because the other room was missing about 16 square feet, gave me more incentive(yeah right)), whatever they used for the ceiling is not the same for the walls, much harder to take down and weighs pretty heavy. I haven't taken down a ceiling before. I hope the 2/5th's come down a lot easier.
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On Sun, 16 Mar 2008 00:52:43 -0000, snipped-for-privacy@host122.r-bonomi.com (Robert Bonomi) wrote:

Actually both spellings are correct. In the original English it was lathe. Common use today tends to favour (note the spelling) lath.
Lathe \Lathe\ (l[=a][th]), n. [OE. lathe a granary; akin to G. lade a chest, Icel. hla[eth]a a storehouse, barn; but cf. also Icel. l["o][eth] a smith's lathe. Senses 2 and 3 are perh. of the same origin as lathe a granary, the original meaning being, a frame to hold something. If so, the word is from an older form of E. lade to load. See to load.] 1. A granary; a barn. [Obs.] --Chaucer.
Note "the original meaning being, a frame to hold something."
A Lathe is also an ancient geo-political (administrative) division in parts of England (Kent in particular)
--
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On Mar 15, 11:50pm, clare at snyder dot ontario dot canada wrote:

Good reply. I have always used lathe not lath. Most everything I have read regarding the subject uses lathe as well. I am glad someone clarified this for Robert and others.
Mark
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On Sun, 16 Mar 2008 15:14:57 -0700 (PDT), BDBConstruction

Only Yanks use lath. Too bloody lazy to spell correctly. color vs colour, valor vs valour, lite vs light, you'd think ink was expensive or something. <BG>
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"Lite" is a brand name for a kind of substance that pretends to be beer. The things that go on the ceiling and provide illumination are "lights" as is the radiation that they emit, and one of the properties of helium gas, and so on.

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The plaster and lathe has come down (in the dining room), what a mess. Tons of shimming to do, the joists are all over the place. A quick eyeball around its at least 1 1/2", looks like they sag but all are even at the top. I can see the living room being even messier. I guess I'm going the run the furring front to back and left to right.
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If I take it all down, which way would you run the strips if needed? One of the joists is 24" across, the rest is about 16" centers.
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"noreaster" <noreaster1athotmaildotcom> wrote in message

I forgot to ask, which way would run the sheets? Not all my joists are 16" centers, one is 24"
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On Fri, 14 Mar 2008 23:01:19 -0400, "noreaster" <noreaster1athotmaildotcom> wrote:>I forgot to ask, which way would run the sheets? Not all my joists are 16"

Some people will laugh, but drywall has "grain," believe it or not. For a demonstration of this, see Taunton's book on sheetrock. It will sag greater across the long dimension than it will across the short dimension. Now read why this is important to you:
Because you have a mix of spacing, I'd suggest furring strips on 16" centers. Also, sheetrock people usually recommend 5/8" on ceilings to minimize sag (may even be code). My 35 year old ceilings have noticable (with lights on) sag with 16" spacing and 3/8" thickness.
Regardless of how you'd *like* to do it, with your joists running crosswise (right to left), furring will effectively force you to run your drywall 90 to what you want/should without furring. In other words, if you were rocking directly to the joists, the sheets should be installed with the long side perpendicular to the joists (long dimension front to back)--your stated preference.
Now, although theoretically you could still run the drywall "front-to-back" (because of the multiples-of-16" dimensions of the rock), if you take into account the "grain" of the rock, you can see you will need to run the rock left-to-right, i.e., long dimension parallel to the joists.
By the way, 5/8" will make you think in terms of a lift, as well--it's heavy. So long as you'll be using a lift, you're back to thinking about 12 footers, again. It kind of depends on the dimension of the ceiling, but you could save as much as 15-20% time and effort taping and mudding difficult butt joints.
One other thing: edge support. Along the walls which are perpendicular to the joists (or furring strips, if you use them), you'll have plenty of support for the edges of the rock. On the other two, you won't. In new construction, they rock the ceilings first so that the wall rock can be butted up to the ceiling rock, thus supporting the edges of the ceiling rock. You may want to consider bridging the joists along the two parallel walls. Fur close to the wall to provide that missing support, or screw into those bridges directly if you don't fur.
Oh, yeah. Screw. Period. Especially with 5/8". Get/rent a screw gun. Trust me. It's a gazillion times easier and faster, although you can get by with an inexpensive attachment for your drill. If you don't get a gun, a cordless is generally a better tool than a corded, because it's almost instant off. A corded drill tends to "wind down" some when you release the trigger, thus making the guaging of proper drive depth a hit-or-miss affair, which might be marginally workable on walls, but isn't acceptable on ceilings. You don't want to tear the paper by going too deep with the screw.
--
LRod

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If I'm understanding to what you are suggesting I do is: If I run furring strips front to back 16" OC, drywall left to right?
What I failed to mention this is a ceiling for the first floor in a 2 story house. What I had done in the kitchen was run furring strips front to back, drywall left to right with 4x8 sheets, some spots I still notice because I know where they are.
That's why I would like to use 4x12's with 3" towards the front that wont be noticed when I'm done. I'll take off the plaster then lath, find out how much the lift would cost to rent. I only have 6 sheets to put up for 2 rooms.
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*snip*

One more suggestion: Make sure you don't miss any rows of screws. I've got an attic space in the garage where the installer missed a row of screws and the drywall's drooping, ready to fall as a result. I haven't quite decided how to fix it. (Probably use a 1x2 to hold it up... Simple and easy fix.)
Puckdropper
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I wont miss a row. I'll put up enough screws to hold up the drywall so I can get all the sheets up then go fill in the blanks. I don't use any nails, screws work much easier and wont pop out. I try getting what screws I can to go thru thru drywall, furring strips and joist where I can.

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On Mar 16, 9:39 am, "noreaster" <noreaster1athotmaildotcom> wrote:

If the strapping is well attached to the joists you don't need to worry about getting drywall screws into the joists. If the strapping is not well attached a few drywall screws won't help much.
R
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I'm making sure the strapping is very well attached. I don't want to have to go fix it later down the road.

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NOT SO FAST; NOT SO "PROPER"

When you have UNEVEN ceiling joists, the approach you appear to have mentioned of installing 1 x 2" (or 1x3") strips perpendicular to the run of the joists i correct.
Drill holes in the strips for nailing and use shims to assure that these strips are level (bottom surfaces all in the same horizontal plane) and set 12" or 16" (max) O.C.
I used construction adhesive to secure the shims in place (on one or both sides of the nail/screw fastening these strips to the joists) after getting everything level. THen screwing/nailing the strips firmly to the joists.
Adhering the dry-wall to these strips so that the end/butt joints fall on a strip will make those joints easier to obscure with mud - though it takes a bit of planning.
I also used dry-wall adhesive on the stips to secure the sheet-rock to them - reduces pull out and noise.
HFT sells a dry-wall mud splatter gun thing ($19 on sale) that allows you to spray mud on the ceiling so as to really hide any imperfections in the mudding and reduce the need for sanding/finishing while providing an interesting look. You can also "texture" the ceiling using a LONG NAP roller and wet mud - more time consuming and a different texture.
In a Kitchen (where grease is an issue) or a shop (where dust is an issue) the smoother ceiling finish may prove preferable and easier to clean.
HFT Also sells an adjustable support pole thing for $8.99 on sale that will help hold the panels in place if you cannot secure sufficient helpers or a dry-wall lift (rental).
Rent or buy a dry-wall screw gun for the project.
Enjoy
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