Drying Logs for log bed ?'s


Hiya Folks, I recently picked up a number of 6-8" diameter logs that I intend to make a log bed from. These are from fresh cut trees (pine). I think I should probably let them dry out before embarking on this project. So I have a few questions I was hoping the collective wisdom of the group could help with. 1. Do I need to dry them out or build this while they're still green? 2. If I should dry them, should I remove the bark first (to speed drying) or leave it on? 3. Building a pseudo kiln of concrete blocks, plastic, and screen material is possible. I want to keep bugs from invading the logs while drying so are there any recommendations here? 4. And finally, to keep bugs from burrowing and eventually hatching, are there any sort of recommendations regarding pesticides? I really don't want to stain the wood with pesticide or screw up the logs for finishing later so thought I'd ask.
I appreciate any insight. Cheers, cc
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

a
project.
If you put it together with the green logs it will twist, shrink and otherwise distort.

Remove it. Not so much to affect the drying, but to keep the bug problem under control.

material
Well, if you can build a dryer, then go for it. De-bark the logs first and then dry them. It's going to take a lot of drying time to dry those logs though. You can hit the logs with just about any commercial insecticide and you won't cause any harm with coloration, etc.

want
so
DAGS on borate mixtures - there's a lot written about it. I don't use it, but there's a ton of information out there. Again, just about any of the commonly available insecticides will do the job and will not leave anything behind that will affect your ability to finish the wood. I live in a log home and I use Spectracide every year to treat for little critters. We keep a very close eye for things like carpenter ants and wood boring wasps, etc. We've lived in this house for over 20 years now and we've been able to keep insect issues well under control this way.
Spray it on right after you peel the logs and let it work while you're peeling the next log. By the time you're done and get your drier ready to go, your logs should be ready as well. If you're worried, hit them again before your put your finish on. Just give it some time to work.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You can build green, but you have to allow for shrinkage. The tenons will become loose unless you pre-dry. Make sure they're locked.

Of course. One of bark's chief functions is to hold the water in the tree. Trouble is, your winter cut wood is the toughest to peel. Bark spud or drawknife.

Plastic on the ground, Borax (Ronald Reagan stuff) on the plastic, and logs on pallets or big stickers. Defend against the rain, but provide lots of air.

See above. Are you sure your bed can't be made with split rails? Do the Abe Lincoln bit and you can sleep on it next spring, if you bring the stuff indoors in the fall.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks folks for the suggestions. So I think I'm heading into the drying business! I'll get the logs peeled with my drawknives and get them drying in a cheaply fashioned kiln (cmu block!). I'll take a look at the borax and spectracide as well. The bugs are terrible here in terms of termites and other boring insects so it's good to know these chems won't damage/stain the wood. Thanks for the help. Cheers, cc
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
James "Cubby" Culbertson wrote:

To minimize checking, seal the endgrain now if you have not already. Wax (like melted parrafin, it needs to be thicker than a paste-waxed surface) is best. Shellac is good. Glue is good. Latex paint is not much better than nothing.
Left round in log form the wood might not warp or twist while it dries, but it will check for sure. You can minimize that, but not eliminate it.
--

FF


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

drying
drying
and
and
the
Yup - it will twist. That's part of the charm of a log home.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Read up on blue stain, I got some big pine timbers sawed and made a timber framed staircase and didn't know how to properly let them dry. It is mold eating the natural sugars in the sap and they leave a blue stain in the wood that is impossible to remove but it does not harm the wood any. As I understand it you want them outside in the wind for a while. I put mine inside a warm garage and within weeks had mold all over them.

a
project.
material
want
so
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.