Drought

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It has been very dull and boring here. The summer is here and everyone is out doing other things.
This is just an observation. We are in our fifth year of below normal rainfall here in western Oregon. This year, since the rainy season began in October, we are about 24 inches behind normal. I can tell how dry it has been because of the fresh wood that I am turning. Normally, at this time of year, I would expect that a fresh cut tree would give me, the walls, and ceiling a drenching shower with all of the water in it. Instead, all I get is a few spots on my glasses, and a bit of surface water on the bowl. the bowls are drying in less than half the normal time. This is just too weird. robo hippy
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And yet the powers that be insist we need more data before we do anything about global warming or global climate change... Heaven forbid we take any pre-emptive action to protect the environment.
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You're confusing "weather" with "climate".
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Most of the global warming types spend there lives in a state of confusion.
wrote:

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Thats because they only eat shriveled up raw veggies, don't drive, don't use wood, gas or oil for heat or cooking, don't bathe(pew!) and walk wherever they go. Problem is they live too far from anyplace to walk to and don't have the strength to get there on veggies only. SInce they can't get anyplace to argue with anybody, they argue with themselves and believe the sky is falling. That's confusion!
CW wrote:

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Let's see in Portland area you have received about 55% of the normal rainfall this year compared to the 1970 to 2000 average. Yet Southern California has received almost 200% of it's normal rainfall in the same time. Using micro-measurements to predict or track macro changes is not good science. That being said there is no doubt that the worlds climate is changing. The questions that have relevance are. What is man's effect in that and what can we do to change the current trends? We are far better off spending money and time fixing what we can with clean water, open space, cleaning up some of the industrial messes and such quality of life issues that buying into some one world solution where the burden is lain on the big nations and all the "developing nations" continue business as normal.
It's another one of those subjects where newsgroup postings will not change anyone's mind but it's Friday and I just couldn't restrain myself. If you want to make a difference this weekend take a bag along on your hike and pick up trash in the state park as you go along, don't put more fertilizer on your grass and make sure you turn off the lights when you leave the room. Think local it makes a real difference.
Sorry for the rant. Allen
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Allen, I agree completely - our primary responsibility definitely has to be our personal choices. The products we spray on our lawn, the cars we drive, how much we drive, the foods we eat, and even the woods we choose all have impacts beyond our yards or driveways or kitchens or shops.
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Allen wrote:

Well, the last certainly doesn't follow from the preceding...and it's not totally clear there's anything outside other normal cycles despite the claims of proponents of the theory...
<That> said, :) there's certainly reason to consider environmentalimpact.
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I guess that's my point Duane. I buy into global climatic change but I do not buy into global warming nor do I believe that man's totally responsible for said changes as they well be cyclic stuff that's been going on for millions of years nor am I convinced we can break that change cycle. What we can do is make sure where we hang out every day is clean and we can drink the water and fish in it and it's not all paved and I have wood to build stuff with and I have deer to hunt and pheasant for the Finn McCool the Wonder pup to chase (and me to shoot and eat). It all comes down to quality of life. I don't want to live in a bubble so I do what can to keep my part neat and clean.
Allen
Far better is it to dare mighty things, to win glorius triumphs, even though checkered by failure... than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy nor suffer much, because they live in a gray twilight that knows not victory nor defeat.
Theodore Roosevelt
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BINGO! We're actually still in the most recent Ice Age. Throughout most of the earth's existence, it's been a *lot* warmer than it is now.

I'm not even convinced we should *try*.

Ayup.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
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Right with you there, buddy. Seems like there's nowhere you can go ANYWHERE... shore, parks, even state forests... and there's plastic bags, bottles and wrappers wherever you go. Not to mention "empty" plastic cigarette lighters. They're like mushrooms... everywhere.
If "Littering" becomes an olympic sport, the USA will take the gold, silver, and bronze medals every year. It IS a local thing, people. Pick up the first plastic bag you see in the woods, and I'll bet you can fill it with other litter in 15 minutes. You'll feel a little better when you drop it off in a trash can.
Back to the shop. Gotta finish the solid walnut bathtub before the plumber gets here.
Jeff
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On Fri, 1 Jul 2005 13:13:47 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Jeff Gagnon) wrote:

Funny, we just spent a day in Rocky Mountain National forest a few weeks ago. Very little litter anywhere, neither at the picnic area nor around Bear Lake or Nymph Lake, nor in any of the parking lots.
Spent time on the beach in Oceanside, California in April. Again, no real significant amount of trash except in a few places along the wave barriers where some had been deposited by waves -- but not in any real great amounts.

Wouldn't exactly bet on that. Had some friends who spent time in Japan, they climbed Mt Fuji and were astounded at the huge amount of litter (bags, water bottles, etc.) on the trail. They indicated it was worse than anything they had seen at US Parks.

+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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I agree. While we're not terribly clean we're doing a lot better than we did in the 70's. It's also regionally worse in places. It was not uncommon to see someone toss something out a car window when I lived in Pensacola FL but when I lived in Washington state you never saw that and I suspect people would have tracked you down if you had. I see some on my weekend hikes here in MD but it's usually Sat am and attributable to kids out partying on Friday night and such. I'm also not the only one I see hiking with a shopping bag and rarely is my bag ever full.
Allen
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On Fri, 1 Jul 2005 13:13:47 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Jeff Gagnon) wrote:

Kind of makes me feel fortunate to live where I do. I don't see that much litter around anywhere in my area- don't know if that's a matter of efficient road crews, adopt-a-highway programs, high littering fines, or people just not throwing trash all over (probably a combination of all of that) but there's definately not as much crap on the roadways as there used to be! I do remember it being a real problem 10 or 15 years ago, but these days an empty can on the side of the road sticks out like a sore thumb. The biggest difference is in the volume of cigarette butts- there used to be drifts of those suckers in every gutter, but there aren't really that many anymore.
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    Greetings and Salutations...
On Sat, 02 Jul 2005 06:51:19 -0500, Prometheus

the Great Smoky Mtns National Park for 40 years or so, and have seen quite a change there. In the 70s and 80s, It was amazing how much trash there was along the trails. Drink containers, cigarette cases, mayo bottles, cans, etc. Even found a number of used, disposable diapers. I got in the habit of taking a trash bag along, and would often fill it on a short hike.     However, in the 90s, things improved quite a bit, and, while there IS some trash on the trails these days, it is far less obvious than it used to be. There is also a somewhat smaller number of trash items along the road by the front of my property...but, there are STILL a lot of empty beer containers...     So...some improvement here and there, but, not QUITE enough yet.     Regards     dave mundt
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On Mon, 04 Jul 2005 00:00:05 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@esper.com (Dave Mundt) wrote:

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robo hippy wrote:

We've been in a similar period until last summer...this year so far has been <near> normal, altho we're starting to get really dry again. (Of course, just now we're trying to finish up wheat harvest so we'd be glad to see another few days of no severe storms and dry, then some moisture.)
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Actually, this post was supposed to go to the rec turners group. It was late thirty when I did this after several long nights getting ready for the nest two shows, this weekend and next. What gets me is that weather drought or monsoons, they blame it on El Nino, and or la Nina. The year before the drought started, we had double the normal rainfall. I guess that is why they call it 'average' rainfall. robo hippy
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robo hippy wrote:

Yep...areas such as where you are tend (over the long run) to have something more nearly resembling an average. Here, where virtually our entire annual rainfall (which averages on the order of 18") comes in the form of scattered thunderstorms in the spring/early summer, the thought of any year being "average" is <purely> a statistical concept.
Three years ago was the driest we've recorded at the farm since Grandpa came in 1912--less than 7". That beat the lowest of the "Dirty Thirties" Dust Bowl year by over 2". Last year was something over 27", third-highest in town since they began keeping records in 1888 (only a blink in time, of course). It's only slightly under a 1% probability that any given day is a new "record" for us... :)
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wrote:
<snip>

Funny that you mention crops, Dave... A neighbor is a county Ag inspector and she's been working WAY too much overtime this month.. She was saying last night that the "stone crops" (peaches, plums, etc.) usually are ready to pick in mid or late July, but it's been such a wet winter and hot spring/summer that they've been picking them since early June... (shortly after a spring rain storm screwed up the raisin crop, a biggie around here)
mac
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