DROP BOX OR WHERE TO FIND PLANS FOR WORKTABLE?

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Hi, folks.
I am wanting to build a 4 x 8' worktable/layout table or whatever it may be called. I would like to use a 4 x 8 sheet of plywood for the top and four 4 x 4s for the legs.
Sounds simple but I would like to see what others have done.
I don't have a dovetail jig or a biscuit joiner - yet.
Could someone direct me to sources for plans?
Thanks
j/b
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I forgot to say that the table will be for general use, such as putting a Delta planer on top, a small metal slip roll and give me a place to build and assemble various projects.
j/g

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Consider getting a solid core door for the top rather than plywood. Also consider doubling 2x4s instead of 4x4s for the posts, they will be more stable. There's a ton of plans out there for benches.
-Kevin
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Thanks, Kevin.
I will use your suggestion of (2) 2 x 4s.
I want a 4 x 8 foot top, still.
Yes, in fact, there are way too many plans. I just thought that someone knew of a few tried-and-true, most desireable plans.
j/b

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Get 48 feet of 1X6 in 8-foot lengths also. Cut two of the 6 lengths at 46-1/2" (you get four pieces). Nail (or screw) two 46-1/2" 1X6 to two 4X4's, one at the top of the leg and the other maybe one foot from the bottom. Repeat for the other two legs. These are your end leg assemblies. Then nail the 8' long pieces to the two end leg assemblies. Nail the plywood to the frame. If you want, you could also put a cross-piece in the middle top.
Bingo, no plans needed. I had a table like that for a number of years and it was quite useful until I built a proper bench.
Luigi
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Thanks, Luigi,
I want a proper bench/table, too. I still want a plywood top, however.
I appreciate your suggestions.
j/b

Get 48 feet of 1X6 in 8-foot lengths also. Cut two of the 6 lengths at 46-1/2" (you get four pieces). Nail (or screw) two 46-1/2" 1X6 to two 4X4's, one at the top of the leg and the other maybe one foot from the bottom. Repeat for the other two legs. These are your end leg assemblies. Then nail the 8' long pieces to the two end leg assemblies. Nail the plywood to the frame. If you want, you could also put a cross-piece in the middle top.
Bingo, no plans needed. I had a table like that for a number of years and it was quite useful until I built a proper bench.
Luigi
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Go here and make a few notes on the construction:
http://www.newyankee.com/getproduct.php?0207
All you need is a saw,drill,tape measure and some screws.
The size can be almost anything you wish.
justme wrote:

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Okay, Pat. Nothing is free, is it?
I revere Norm, though.
Thanks
j/b

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Here is a complete plan for the portable table with drop down wheels much like the NYW version but free plans.
http://woodworking.about.com/od/shopequipmentsupplies/ss/portableTable.htm
Keep in mind while 4' x 8' top is a nice natural size, many folks find something a little smaller, at least in the 4' dimension is actually more convenient to be able to reach across and work with. Also, build it with 2 top sheets, one sacrifical that can be replaced over the years as it gets scarred up (plan height correctly). Also consider melamine or phenolic or laminate top to avoid glue stick down problems. (anybody have a preference here?)
Also, take note of the step to build a torsion box or strong underpinning for the top so you can keep it close to dead flat for precise layouts, buildups, etc. Having those straight edges and flat surface make for square building real easy.

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Thanks. Coincidentally, I had come across this plan through Google. I may use the top and stringers but definitely not the legs. I need beefy legs. I am not sure about the caster mechanism. I would rather have locking casters but they are expensive. Nevrtheless, I like the plans.
j/b
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I have worked on many tables of similar design and feel these legs are as strong as any 4x4 but a 4x4 is also fine. The caster mechanism seems a little flaky when you look at it but it is actually really cool because when they are up the table stands on the legs alone no shimey form a locking caster and you simply lift the end of the table a few inches and the casters fall in place an lock.

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I had not considered shimmy from a locking caster. You have convinced me to use drop-down casters.
Some suggested that I use 2- 2x4s for each leg, of which I will do, too.
Thanks for your help.
j/b
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"justme" wrote:

Cut a rabbit in each 2x4 so that when 2x4's are assembled, you have an interlocking joint at the corner of the leg if you want to increase the strength of the leg.
Lew
BTW, using 1/2 ply for gusset plates to attach legs improves the strength of the top/leg joint tremendously.
Lew
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Lew, I think that I will bolt the 2 x 4s and I am thinking that will be enough?
Thank you,
j/b

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"justme" wrote:

Might want to give that some thought.
Lew
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wrote:

I built the table with the setup like in the NYW plans. In a word it is the NUTS. I have a few friends who have tables with locking casters and the table moves a bit. My table is on solid ground and does not move at all when planing, sawing, sanding, etc. When I want it out of the way I just pick up the side a few inches and the wheels drop down.
Larry C
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I also built the NYW version using plywood.
It is quick,easy and fairly cheap.
It is also VERY strong and very stable.
I think that using 2x4's would make it overly heavy and not any better.
I did add a lower shelf which is very handy and makes the table even more stable.
If I made another, I would add a few drawers instead of a open shelf.
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Hey, Pat.
I will make it with a lower shelf. However, sometimes, I may have to move it outside and I want BEEF.
Thanks
j/b

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You've sold me, Larry.
I appreciate your ideas.
j/b
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wrote:

One more thing. I learned a while ago to try and make all of my tables, benches, etc for the shop the same height as my table saw, jointer, etc. That way they can double as an outfeed, infeed, comfortable cup holder, etc.
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