drill press decision

I'm a woodworking newbie and trying to decide on what drill press to get:
1. Fisch DP2000, 12" 6-speed motor: 1/3HP speed range: 500-3100 2-3/8" quill travel chuck: 1/2" comes with a 7pc. Forstner set
2. Delta DP350 12" 5-speed motor: 1/3HP speed range: 620-3100 quill stroke: 2-3/8" chuck: 1/2" chuck to table 14-1/8"
I have two concerns: 1. quality 2. I am not sure if the Fisch can take a mortising attachement. I know Delta makes a Mortising attachement for its drill presses but I don't know if that can attach to the Fisch drill press.
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<snip>
You might want to hold off on the mortising attachment, until you google the archives... IMHO, there are other, (usually) better ways to mortise.
I have the 17" Delta drill press, and find it to be a good machine. Whether that translates to anything in the size/price range you seek is an open question.
Patriarch
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Consider a Palmgren: (Amazon.com product link shortened)04997047/sr=1-9/ref=sr_1_9/102-9208339-5187338?v=glance&s=hi http://www.palmgren.com/palmgren/index.html Sears is buying four of their tools, two lathes, the small tilting bandsaw and a scroll saw, under the Craftsman name. I think what matters with a mortising attachment is the width of the quill of the DP, and http://www.grizzly.com/ makes several sizes.
--
Alex
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I think for a drill press I might look for an oldie but a biggie. What I mean by that is old American made drill presses are around in the used market and still do a pretty good job. Even if the table has a hundred holes punched in it a floor model that has 18+ inches between the chuck and the column will be more convenient than a 12 incher.
A screwed up table can be covered by adding some laminate coated MDF and a bum chuck can easily be replaced.
--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
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SNIP
Agreed... As long as you can still get parts for it should it stop functioning.
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Regards,
Joe Agro, Jr.
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coolron wrote:

< snip of 12" choices >
I am not sure what your critera is for selection in terms of space, price etc. but the drill press is the *only* stationary tool I have replaced because I was dissatisfied with it, and I replaced a 12" Delta with a Delta 16 1/2" 17-965. The quality of the little Delta was acceptable, but maximum stroke was too short, slowest speed was much too fast, the throat was a little small and there was no quill lock. The larger DP is much nicer to use. Drill presses are remarkably cheap; all things considered, you might want to reconsider the small one and go for something bigger. BTW, it is also indespesible. Of all my tools, the DP and bandsaw are the ones I couldn't do without (though I admit the TS and thickness planer rate pretty high).
PK
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I'd reconsider even bothering with the mortising attachment as well. The things are a real PITA to set up and use. Plus, IMO they are not nearly as accurate as a dedicated mortiser. I used the attachment for quite some time until i bought a dedicated one. The difference in the set up time and quality of the mortises has improved tenfold. --dave

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wrote:

I currently have 3 drill presses in my shop and the one is set up 50 percent of the time just do do mortices... so I have no or very little set up time.....and the entire set up DP & attachment was much less expensive then buying a dedicated machine....
I will agree with you however that the dedicated morticer is much better, easier to use , etc.......just in my case another drill press was a much better buy because I really do not cut a heck of a lot of mortices...
Bob Griffiths
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I have the cousin of the DP350 - the 11-990. It's a good starter and I haven't outgrown it yet. But I share Paul's laments about the quill travel, the throat depth, the slowest speed. It's on my to-do list to replace, but down on the list.
I also share Dave's opinions about doing the mortising on one of these. My neighbor has a larger Delta DP (floor standing) and the mortising attachments. I don't think I'd enjoy using those attachments at all.
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I have the DP350. I have been very happy with it. The DP350 is variable speed not 5-speed. I also have the mortise attachment. Works great. Sure it takes longer to set up than a dedicated mortiser (most people wine about this), but I'm not in that big a hurry when im woodworking. I'm not running a production shop (yet). Time is not a huge concern.

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Thank you all for the info!
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Might be worth it to buy the Harbour Freight morticer, usually on sale from time to time for $99.xx http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber5570 When took a gander at it in the store, I liked how it is made compared to the basic little Delta that was in my adult ed. class, with all it's stamped thin metal... but I would buy more expensive chisle-bits than they offer.
Alex
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