Drill Press Advice

Hi All, I am thinking of buying a drill press sometime soon and was hoping to poll the wreck on size. I primarily am a woodworker, though a year ago I would have said that I was primarily a metal worker so something powerful enough for both is helpful, as is speed adjustment. Mainly I see myself using the drill press for small applications where I want to have holes perfectly aligned, perpendicular to the work piece etc.
I am basically wondering about the size of the throat or reach or whatever the distance from the spindle to the pole is. Is bigger always better? Or is this one of the few chances where I can save some money and get a 60B sooner rather than later.
Thanks
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Bigger is always better. Far easier to drill a tiny hole with a larger DP that to try to do the opposite.
I have a 12" Delta benchtop and it suits my needs. If I had the space and the money, I'd go bigger.
Once you finally have the DP of your dream, make a table for it with clamps and a sliding fence. It can easily be removed for metalworking if you are going to se cutting oils, etc. There have been photos of a few of them posted so when ready, either do a Google search or ask again.
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...think all the popular cheap machines are the same other than color. I had the Delta 16" floor model and now have the Delta 17" floor model. Hate the latter (threaded rod depth stop that is worthless), loved the former (dial depth stop). Doesn't take much pressure to bypass the threads on the threaded rod thing whereas when you locked in the dial on the other one, it was set. For woodworking throat depth on either machine was more than I ever needed, usually drilling to within 1-3 inches from the edge and both provided enough table to clamp a rear fence to get the job done. Other than that they machines are pretty much the same...speed change via re-arranging the pulleys is not that big a deal...chart on the wall with speed suggestions depending on the type/size of bit, speed chart on the inside cover of the DP with the pulley arrangement to get close to that speed...literally seconds such that I don't see the big deal with the newer variable speed machines driven by dial.

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IMO bigger is better. Mark

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"Tattooed and Dusty"

I like my Delta Model 17-968. I do both metal fabrication and woodworking. This machine 16-1/2" does fit the bill nicely. Having the variable speed control on the face is a big benefit. I would buy it again if I needed another.
Dave
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Floor models save bench space...I have mine on wheels, but it's tippy. So far, I've never needed the increased depth.
Wider belts are better. It's hard to get enough torque for big bits with some belt systems. Wilson

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In an emergency, you can take a bench-top drill press, clamp or bolt the base to the bench, and turn the head around 180 degrees so it hangs off the edge of the bench. This lets you drill stock which wouldn't otherwise fit under the chuck.
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I have the 16-1/2" floor model Delta drill press and use it for metal and wood. It has a lot of speeds and would rather have the dial to change speeds, although that adds to the cost. The floor model is much better than the bench top. A larger drill press is better than a small one when you have big jobs to do. Yesterday I needed to drill and countersink 16 holes in 1/4" alumimum and the job was easy and fast. The throat distance is important when you want to drill in the middle of a sheet of something--with mine I could drill a hole in the middle of a 33" square or circle of ply. "Travel" and runout specs are important too.
On 9 Mar 2005 18:23:26 -0800, "Tattooed and Dusty"

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On 9 Mar 2005 18:23:26 -0800, "Tattooed and Dusty"

=============snip snip snip======= I am a serious woodworker BUT also do restoration work on old cars as another hobby... BUT I own 4 drill presses.... 3 of which are in my woodshop... 1.small delta benchtop (infrequent use but convient) 2. older Sears floor model which is a workhorse and I would never part with... (a duplicate is in the garage) 3. a Second delta benchtoip...but mounted horizontally to use as a horizontal boring machine.. (I use it a lot)
All are belt driven and speed is adjusted via pullies etc...not any big deal to adjust speed...10 second job at most in the dark faster with the lights turned on.. honest....no problem
Get the biggest one you can... IF I had only one it would be the floor model ..Both of My Crapsman Floor models were purchase in the late 60's-early 70's and I would not trsade them even up for a new Delta of Jet...
Bob Griffiths
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