Drill chuck not holding well

I have this friend with a probelm..... really....:-)
He has trouble with the keyless chucks on his drills (one cordless, one corded) having the bits slip.
(Craftsman & Black & Decker)
He has tried hand tightening but, the bit still slips. Two drills... multiple bits/
Could it be technique? Foreighn material on the chuck jaws?
Suggestions please.
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Stephen M wandered in from the void and babbled something like:

Common problem, cheap drills, crappy chucks. Get some hex shank bits to avoid it. Sorry to be the bearer of bad news...
Greg
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Probably he has allowed one or more bits to slip in an under-tightened chuck before & damage to the face of the jaws has happened, the tool brands you mention normally come with inexpensive chucks to start with, replace them with better ones or use hex shank bits in them.....if the keyed chuck has multiple pilot holes for the key (normally 3) tighten increasingly firmly in each location, this ensures the chuck is tightened to the max evenly & is often easier to undo than if all the torque is applied at only one point.
Sorry if I am not clear....but I know what I mean. LOL
--
Jon Down
http://www.stores.ebay.com/jdpowertoolcanada
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Cheap chucks. See if he can find some metal-bodied Jacobs or Rohms.
GTO(John)

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Grind a couple flat spots on the shank of the drill, don't go overboard, just enough to give the less expensive chuck something to grab onto.
Dave
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On 17 Dec 2003 01:18:10 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (GTO69RA4) wrote:

Rohm are good, but an awful lot of Jacobs' current production is low-end.
One problem is 1/2" chuck capacity. To get this capacity into a chuck body that's the size (and price) of a 3/8" chuck, it's necessary to use a steep angle on the sloping faces. This gives a poor frictional force to resist slipping loose. Either accept that 1/2" chucks are big and expensive, or use a 3/8".
-- Smert' spamionam
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I have had two B&D keyless chucked drills and they are both crap neither would hold a bit satisfactorily . I is a shame as I learned as a kid how to tighten a regular chuck in the same manner with out a chuck key
-- mike hide

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Thanks you all for the replys... I suspected that it was a case of underwhelming quality. I tend to be a bit of a tool snob, so I thought that I should get a little more input (and a different messenger :-))
-Steve

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