Drawknife sharpening


I recently purchased my first drawknife, a 9" curved-edge model made by two-cherries.
http://www.traditionalwoodworker.com/product_info.php/products_id/256
So far I am generally pleased with it, but it's not nearly as sharp as it could/should be.
I have not invested a whole lot of time in sharpening this thing...yet. I have a few questions:
1. Should the back be lapped dead-flat like a chisel? 2. should I coble together an elivated holder for my waterstone so that I can bring the knife to the stone (when dressing the underside of the knife) Or should I bring the stone to the knife?
I find this to be a really awkward thing to sharpen; any hints would be appreciated.
Thanks,
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sharpen it like you do an axe. put one handle in a vise, hold the other and bring the stone to it. Use circular motions. There are two thought on the back. One is to treat it the same as a chisel. The other is to put a shallow angle on it. I put the angle on it. Just a couple degrees. It gives the ability, when working bevel up, to turn the knife enough to get it up out of the cut.

knife)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks, all.
I tried this approach and it worked pretty well for me. I got shaving arm hair which is bood enough for me.
-Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They are very, very awkward to sharpen. For mine, I built a jig that holds the knife, and also serves as a guide to angle the stone properly. Ideally, I guess it'd have some kinda rollers or something for the stone to ride on, but I just eyeball it. It's very crude - I just took a hunk of tubafour, traced the shape of the drawknife on it, and cut a groove with a angled bottom. The knife sits in there, beveled side up, and the edge is at the correct angle to the stone if the whole rig is level. It's not perfect, but for version 1.0 it works well enough.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A rig of that type would not work with a curved blade of the type the OP has. The traditional method works well and is easy to do. Place one handle on the bench or in the vise, hand holding the other handle so the blade is vertical and the edge is facing away from you. Work the stone against the blade in circular motions just like stoning an axe. Use a long stone to keep your hand back of the edge.

holds
Ideally,
on,
but
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You don't want to let the drawknife slip when you are pulling it toward you. That's what happened to my half-brother.
M.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Michael wrote:

what happened to the other half of him?
<GD&R>
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'll bet he was the half-assed one.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Waste of time to lap the back any more than needed to remove the wire edge. It's anything _but_ a precision instrument.
Forget the waterstone and get a nice India scythe stone. That's how they were generally sharpened. Final hone on a nice ceramic for me. Stone to the metal for the first, metal over stone to finish. The "jig" for the first is a vise holding the metal, for second, same vise holding the stone. Trying to hand-hold is a certain cut.
Now that I have a 320 diamond stone, I might just do it on that next time. A little bit of sawtooth is no drawback, may be an asset when the knife is drawn across the work as it shaves .
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.