Drawings of Shaker furniture in Bath

In the Shaker room of the American museum in Bath (UK) is a small "Tailoresses' Counter". It's a nice piece, a small chest of drawers with an interesting top. The top hinges down at the back, so that it can sit against a wall when not in use. Being an ingenious Shaker product, the top also _slides_ when in use, so that it's symmetrical on the chest and there's no need for a locking gateleg under the hinged flap (the hinge is now locked by being on top of the chest body). Effectively the folding part of the rear flap is "two overhangs" deep, and the whole top slides forward when in use.
I'm looking for drawings for this piece, for a possible reproduction. I don't know if there are any, although there are photographs in several of the usual references (e.g. Shea). If I can't find them, then I'll head off and draw it myself.
There are drawings of something similar in a couple of Handberg's books (actually two different drawings, as they measure the back flap differently). This is described as being from the "Andrews Collection" though, not Bath. I've also heard that some of the Bath pieces were bought from the Andrews collection in the '60s.
I may well measure and re-draw it properly anyway, as Handberg doesn't draw the details of the top slide mechanism.
Does anyone know:
- If the Bath piece is indeed the Andrews piece?
- If there's a drawing of the Bath piece?
- Where these piece(s) were made?
- If Bath will ever put the top back on their wood stove the right way round!
Thanks
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Wed, Jul 21, 2004, 7:16am (EDT-3) snipped-for-privacy@codesmiths.com (AndyDingley) posted: In the Shaker room of the American museum in Bath <snip>
After having read the subject, I almost passed this up. I thought you were talking about you drawing Shaker furniture while you were IN you bath. Thank the Gods it wasn't so.
Interesting. I like Shaker furniture, but never ran across any reference to a piece quite like that. But, there's probably something out there, somewhere, on something similar. You got me curious now, so I'll do a bit of looking, and if I run across anything interesting, I'll post it.
Thank you Andy, for not taking a bath. LMAO
JOAT
We've got a lot of experience of not having any experience. - Nanny Ogg
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It would help to know which Shaker community the piece came, as the Shaker styles varied throughout. There are many sewing tables, including ones that have a single fold-down leaf in the back. I have the book, "The Complete Book of Shaker Furniture" by T.Rieman but it is divided into separate 14 communities. If you decide to make a drawing yourself, I'd like to see it posted.
On 21 Jul 2004 07:16:55 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@codesmiths.com (Andy Dingley) wrote:

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Wed, Jul 21, 2004, 7:16am (EDT-3) snipped-for-privacy@codesmiths.com (AndyDingley) claims: In the Shaker room of the American museum in Bath (UK) is a small "Tailoresses' Counter". <snip>
Well, this book has a "tailor's cabinet". http://www.cambiumbooks.com/books/country_furniture/0-486-27774-7 /
No way of telling if that's what you're looking for or not. I'm thinking you're going to have to measure it, if they'll let you.
JOAT
We've got a lot of experience of not having any experience. - Nanny Ogg
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snipped-for-privacy@codesmiths.com (Andy Dingley) wrote in message

Here's a repro of it http://www.hueyfurniture.com/shaker_furniture.asp
http://www.hueyfurniture.com/images/ShakerTailorsCabinet.JPG
Apparently Popular Woodworking did a plan in December 2000
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Thu, Jul 22, 2004, 7:40am (EDT-3) snipped-for-privacy@codesmiths.com (AndyDingley) says: <snip> Apparently Popular Woodworking did a plan in December 2000 So it would appear. http://www.popularwoodworking.com/features/fea.asp?id=1096
Nice.
JOAT
We've got a lot of experience of not having any experience. - Nanny Ogg
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On Thu, 22 Jul 2004 17:56:03 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

Totally different top though. On the Bath piece, the whole top slides forward on the carcase, so there's no need for the pull-out dropleaf supports.
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Thu, Jul 22, 2004, 11:44pm (EDT+5) snipped-for-privacy@codesmiths.com (AndyDingley) claims: Totally different top though. On the Bath piece, the whole top slides forward on the carcase, so there's no need for the pull-out dropleaf supports.
I knew you'd said the whole top, so I was thinking just a hinge in the joint, then maybe a T-slot. Lift the back part up level, pull the front of the top forward, while making sure the back "runners" aligned in the slots. That's what I was thinking. That way no need for supports. All that thinking, and now you tell me I'm wrong?
JOAT
We've got a lot of experience of not having any experience. - Nanny Ogg
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I hesitate mentioning it because the sewing table on page 146 of Shea's book *Making Authentic Shaker Furniture* is not the piece the OP asked about. It is similar and could be adapted to include the features of the Tailor's desk. :-)
(Andy Dingley) claims: Totally different top though. On the Bath piece, the whole top slides forward on the carcase, so there's no need for the pull-out dropleaf supports.
I knew you'd said the whole top, so I was thinking just a hinge in the joint, then maybe a T-slot. Lift the back part up level, pull the front of the top forward, while making sure the back "runners" aligned in the slots. That's what I was thinking. That way no need for supports. All that thinking, and now you tell me I'm wrong?
JOAT
We've got a lot of experience of not having any experience. - Nanny Ogg
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J T wrote:

I seem to remember a table where the top rotated after the leaf was lifted to provide seating for more people at it. Folded and stored against a wall it was fine for 1-2 people, opened to full size away from the wall it would seat 4, possibly more. It's what I wanted to build for my kitchen, but I can't re,ber where I saw it. I may have printed it out, sou it's just a matter of looking throuth a few reams of semi sorted pages. Joe
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Fri, Jul 23, 2004, 10:29am snipped-for-privacy@charleston.net (JoeGorman) claims: I seem to remember a table where the top rotated after the leaf was lifted to provide seating for more people at it. <snip>
Damn, damn, damn. Never heard of one like that either, but it does seem reasonable. But, now I'm curious, so will do some searching, and if I find anything like that, I'll post it. You guys never heard of a couple of sawhorses, and a few planks? Or, a couple of card tables? Damn high class people.
JOAT Every thing that happens stays happened. - Death waxes philosophical
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On Fri, 23 Jul 2004 15:49:55 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

Pretty common design.

Try the third Tage Frid book. There's not that much in it, but there is a good workbench plan and a chapter on more ways to make an expanding table top than you ever believed was possible.
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That should be easy to deal with. :-)
(J T)

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