Drawer side stock?

Page 1 of 3  
3/4 inch or nominal 1/2 inch? The 1/2 inch is 7/16 alder from the local Menards. Drawer size is approximately 18" square.
Thanks!
Larry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/17/2013 8:06 PM, Gramp's shop wrote:

1/2 always
3/4 looks like crap... 1/2 looks right.
--
Jeff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/17/13 7:06 PM, Gramp's shop wrote:

1/2" (7/16") is plenty. 3/4" would be way over kill. You'd lose space and add weight.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/17/2013 7:06 PM, Gramp's shop wrote:

Swingman and I actually used 3/4" maple for a high end kitchen/bathrooms remodel year before last. There must have been close to 50 drawers total. All dovetailed or rabbeted with added domino reinforcements. They looked rich.
That said, for kitchen or bathroom cabinets for a normal budget job I prefer 1/2" Baltic Birch.
If I were dovetailing absolutely 3/4" solid stock.
Here they are
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/5471710794/in/set-72157622991960362 /
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/5471112571/in/set-72157622991960362
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And some more:
http://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-TQVhMYkCUno/TtEWe6a4SiI/AAAAAAAAIus/9TmY1Xv9wEo/s2048/2011-01-22_15-09-17_987.jpg
http://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-4jKdF9-_GKk/TtEWjkn_i6I/AAAAAAAAIvM/3RQ5eS9nwiw/s2048/2011-02-25_12-13-53.jpg
http://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-DSLXSeHVGCA/TtEWeFaC1YI/AAAAAAAAIuo/sjcZvcKtYhE/s2048/2011-01-21_17-10-41_964.jpg
http://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-0UnS5uB5uWI/TtEWi_9K9II/AAAAAAAAIvI/nKsHeb1VzUQ/s2048/2011-02-23_17-55-41_578.jpg
--
www.ewoodshop.com (Mobile)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Even smaller drawers with 3/4" sides can be gorgeous:
http://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-AReHaM34Qo0/UIHB0cTcXQI/AAAAAAAAPL0/e8j8HoaQ5zc/s2048/78869D24-1E77-4816-BECD-D3038CDD7265.JPG
--
www.ewoodshop.com (Mobile)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Gramp's shop wrote:

Either one but one may be preferable depending...
The 7/16 is fine as long as it is ample for whatever joint you intend to use.
The 3/4 is fine regardless of the joint. Especially if you intend to get max usefulness from the drawer. I almost always partition drawers by cutting 1/4" evenly spaced "V"s into the sides. That lets me easily make moveable partitions.
I also very frequently fit drawers - even very shallow drawers - with sliding trays. I do that by using 3/4" sides and making a wide 1/4" rabbet along the inside top of them. The rabbet is slightly wider than the tray will be deep and the bottom supports the tray. The rabbet also removes the top portion of the "V"s for the bottom part of the drawer. The trays can be either lift out (same size as drawer inside) or sliding (one half or less than the drawer inside); I generally do the latter.
"A place for everything and everything in its place" :-)
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/18/2013 7:25 AM, dadiOH wrote:

+1
--
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com
Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

This isn't an answer to your specific question, and I have read all the other posts about 3/4" being fine, but I'll tell you my story:
I built 2 slide out boxes for all of our plastic containers, one for the covers, one for the containers themselves. They each take up 1/2 of one base cabinet, i.e. one above the shelf, one below it.
I used 3/4" ply and bullnosed the top edges. They always look bulky to me when I extend them. Maybe it's because they aren't holding any "visual weight" but they just look overbuilt. 2 years later and I still wonder if they would look better had I gone with 1/2" stock.
I may be building all new drawers for my kitchen soon, so I am very interested in this issue. My current drawers, in 1950's stick built cabinets, are 1/2" stock. I do not plan on replacing the cabinets, just building drawers and doors.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/18/2013 10:51 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Actually, it pretty simple. Go with what does the job, both cost effectively for your budget, and attractively for you and your design.
I use whatever is spec'ed by the client.
Many high end kitchens these days have a professional designer involved in the initial design and almost to a man/woman, they go with 3/4" thick drawer sides/components. There is something to be said for that in both looks and function once you see a well designed kitchen with well executed drawers of that thickness ... it does convey a sense of above average _custom work_ to a kitchen in the upper price range.
That said, I used 1/2" poplar for my own kitchen drawers and they do the job just fine and fit nicely in my budget at the time. Pretty cheesy by today's designer standards. :)
I've also built a ton of drawers for others using 1/2" pre-finished stock.
My choice is to "split the difference", and use 5/8" stock, which is what I generally put in the kitchens in the homes I build.
5/8" drawer thickness, IMO, gives you the best of both worlds, so is worth considering for your new kitchen drawers.
YMMV ...
--
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com
Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/18/2013 10:51 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:
> I may be building all new drawers for my kitchen soon, so I am very > interested in this issue. My current drawers, in 1950's stick built > cabinets, are 1/2" stock. I do not plan on replacing the cabinets, > just building drawers and doors.
On 1/18/2013 11:09 AM, Swingman wrote:

I meant to add that you will certainly want to consider, before you make a decision about your drawer side thickness, the type of drawer slides you will be using.
While it is possible to use just about any thickness you want with some drawer slides; manufacturers of the modern undermount, self/soft close drawer slides will make it much easier for you to dimension your drawer widths for your cabinet opening if you stick to standard 1/2, 5/8 and 3/4 ... but be sure to double check.
In many cases, you may have to buy a specific submodel of the same slide for the corresponding thickness, so don't assume anything in that regard.
--
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com
Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 18 Jan 2013 11:17:15 -0600, Swingman wrote:

Unless the drawers are to handle heavy loads, I see no need for any drawer slides at all. A traditionally fitted drawer is much better.
--
When fascism comes to America, it will be wrapped in the flag and
carrying a cross.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/18/2013 1:49 PM, Larry Blanchard wrote:

Better for what?
My reply was directed to someone who was talking about kitchen drawers, not furniture drawers.
IME, "traditionally fitted" drawers are not going to be well received by the modern kitchen user these days.
Folks want soft/self closing drawers, and doors, in their kitchens now, often with other sliding components, none of which they are going to get with "traditionally fitted" drawers, at least not without the time and expense that would make it prohibitive to begin with ... they will want to put their money somewhere else where they get more bang for their buck.
Perhaps for some areas in the kitchen, but certainly not for the majority of the drawers in a moern kitchen, which, when loaded with the myriad of utensils and heavy cooking items these days, the friction sliding of a "traditionally fitted drawer", even with nylon runners, will have a very short life span.
--
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com
Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I already have "traditionally fitted drawers" in my stick built kitchen cabinets and trust me, I'm going to use slides when I build the new ones. Even the nylon runners on the face frame and center bar don't help.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 18 Jan 2013 14:11:48 -0600, Swingman wrote:

Last I looked, this was the "recreational woodworking" group, not the "commercial kitchen cabinet builders" group :-).
(If that sounds a little snippy, it's because Comcast just clobbered all our email accounts and I'm too miserable from the flu to fight with them just now.)
--
When fascism comes to America, it will be wrapped in the flag and
carrying a cross.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/20/2013 8:53 PM, Larry Blanchard wrote: > On Fri, 18 Jan 2013 14:11:48 -0600, Swingman wrote:

So - and upon your last look - when a "recreational woodworker" asks a question/expresses an interest in a subject, only a "recreational" woodworker can answer in this "recreational woodworking" group?
Interesting interpretation of the purpose of this group you got there.
And here all along I was thinking it was global warming, politics, the price of gas, and gun control ... go figure, eh?

So you heard that 'sound' too, but pulled the trigger on the post anyway?
Nice ...
--
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com
Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Shouldn't let his reply irk you. I'm jealous of everything you build too. However, you can redeem yourself by giving away all your woodworking tools to me and taking a vow of poverty.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Poverty? I disagree Karl needs poverty. He really seems to earn his keep. I think his detailed help to people here and elsewhere is reason enough to just be grateful for his wisdom.
--
Best regards
Han
email address is invalid
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

+1
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Agreed plus the photos are worth the price of admission.
Mike M
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.