Drawer issue

Page 2 of 2  


Is it fair to assume that Danny Proulx knows a thing or two about cabinets?
and I quote:
CABINET BOX CONSTRUCTION by Danny Proulx
What's the best way to build the carcass (cabinet box) for kitchen cabinets? And, which material is ideally suited for kitchen cabinet construction? Those are two questions that make-up a good portion of my email each month. Do I have the definitive answer? Unfortunately, there isn't one product that's flawless. Many cabinetmakers, including myself, have opted for 5/8" melamine coated particle board (MPCB) as the material of choice. That's not to say there aren't a few drawbacks with this material, however, in almost all situations MPCB is very acceptable.
Base cabinet boxes are built with two sides (gable ends), a bottom, and a back. The upper cabinets have two gable ends, a bottom, top, and back board. Base cabinets don't need the top board as the countertop covers that opening. Normally, with carcass construction using the Euro cabinet leg, bottom and top boards are attached to the gable ends. In effect, the width of the bottom and top boards determine the carcass interior width because the gable ends are attached to these boards using simple butt joints. The back board then covers all the edges of the bottom, top, and gable end components.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Bzzzt! and Bzzzt! and Bzzzt! 0 for 3
1) Never trust a person whose name ends in an X. 2) I've already explained where the confusion came in on gable and why Canada should just roll over on this one and take it like a man. 3) It's not carcass, it's carcase - as in casegoods, casework. A carcass is a dead body. The original word for cabinet work was carcase, but it was misunderstood by some quasi-literate in the past, who simply misunderstood the word and wrote down the phonetic spelling of what he thought he heard. On his behalf, I can only assume he never saw the word in writing and the person speaking was drunk or had a cleft palate. Maybe he was a bit light in the loafers and had a lisp. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casework http://www.wicnet.org/publications/casework.asp
I'm willing to slide on the last one, as the US and Brits have split on carcass/carcase, but the first two - no way. Especially the first - no final Xs unless it's a royalty lineage designation.
R the X 10th Earl of Mumbleland
PS There's one more Bzzzt! for old Danny Proulx - tell him to proofread his articles. Acronyms are much easier to understand if you don't switch the letters around: "melamine coated particle board (MPCB)"
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
[...]

The initials are in the correct order. They stand for "melamine particle core board".
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Oct 28, 9:44 pm, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Agreed. So Danny Proul(x) should have written "melamine particle core board (MPCB)", the 'coated' being implied/inferred.
R(x) Wreck Minority Whip - Acronym Standards Committee (WMW-ASC)
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In article <e13fc8b3-c956-4c09-b7c3-
says...

Just variant spellings of the same word. Carcass equals carcase (OED). There are no further distictions to be made.
It derives from the word charcois.
...and it all adds up to a frame of bones or wood on which something is hung or was hung.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Agreed, that's why I said I'm willing to slide - but where's the fun in that? ;)

Perhaps. Or Italian/Latin - you can never tell with those romantic languages.

A frame is different than a carcase/carcass. Frame 2. a rigid structure formed of relatively slender pieces, joined so as to surround sizable empty spaces or nonstructural panels, and generally used as a major support in building or engineering works, machinery, furniture, etc.
Carcass/carcase refers to the body of the cabinet, as separate from the doors and drawers. In days gone by it may have been a frame and panel box, or a box from solid sawn boards. A frame is a skeleton.
R
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I hang most of my pictures in skeletons?....depending what skeleton of mind I'm in?
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Exactly. South of _our_ border (that's North of their border to you) we hang skeletons in closets - until TMZ gets a hold of 'em. Then we sell the video and make a ton of money.
R
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Bottom mount drawer slides?
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Many of the soft-close slides are bottom mounted and for wider drawer boxes.
wrote: Bottom mount drawer slides?

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Your problem is not stated clearly enough.
If when opening the doors they do not provide sufficient clearence for the glides to pass by you should look for a hinge which allows for a full 180 degree opening. This will provide only a small amount of extra clearence at best.
If you have made face frames cabinets, you can install spacers between the drawer glides and the side panels of the case work, if your drawers are not to wide, in which case, unfortunately you will need to rebuild the drawer boxes.
JoeG
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If the drawers only hold light loads, such as clothing, they don't need slides.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.