Drawer Dividers

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Thanx for that. I would have to find a more local place. I am not sure how hard they would would kick me going across the border via shipping though. UPS and FedEx have bad reputations for this unless precleared by paying Canuck taxes up front.
I guess I need to search for local hardwood suppliers more thoroughly, since I will have some time coming up. I know HD is brutal to buy a piece of 3/4" x 8" x 60" red oak for $45 here. Be the end of my hobby of that keeps up...LOL
No, no. The proper tool for resaw is the bandsaw. Get some 8/4 maple or poplar or birch. You can resaw it to 5/16" or 3/8" and plane or thickness sand to 1/4". Or resaw to 3/16" or 1/4" to get 1/8".
If you don't have the tools needed, buy thin lumber on line. I did a quick Google and found several places. Among them:
http://www.kencraftstore.com/woods/soft_maple.htm
On Sun, 09 Jan 2011 11:35:32 -0500, Josepi wrote: I can see myself buying a table saw one of these days. I know too many lost an eye and other parts with them so I have avoided it and the room space is a factor.
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It seemed you were mentining what 1/8" thick material you can buy and I was just saying that you probably need to make it if you want real wood at 1/8" think.
If you had a planer, I would describe how to make them with that piece of equip. and bandsaw, a tablesaw, etc. When pure white is needed usually Bass wood or Holly are used. Clean hard Maple can work also but you will always get some mineral color so harder to get 100% white.
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Yes, a planar may be on the buy list fairly soon.
It seemed you were mentining what 1/8" thick material you can buy and I was just saying that you probably need to make it if you want real wood at 1/8" think.
If you had a planer, I would describe how to make them with that piece of equip. and bandsaw, a tablesaw, etc.
When pure white is needed usually Bass wood or Holly are used. Clean hard Maple can work also but you will always get some mineral color so harder to get 100% white.
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Poplar is one of the most stable easy working, fine grained wood. It is what I would use. It also is easy to finish, and is closed grained, so it finishes slick and smooth, easily.
Basswood works almost as easy, and has good finishing grain also, but is a bit softer.
--
Jim in NC


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Poplar seams to be the wood of choice and the one I figured to use but is there a source of say 1/4" matrial in this?. I considered flooring underlay (3/16" ??) but I believe it is only one sided and the plies would show.
Poplar is one of the most stable easy working, fine grained wood. It is what I would use. It also is easy to finish, and is closed grained, so it finishes slick and smooth, easily.
Basswood works almost as easy, and has good finishing grain also, but is a bit softer.
--
Jim in NC


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I found some nice poplar stock at HD today 1/4" x 3" x 4' long for under $10 so there is hope. Thye also had a few other handy sizes and thicknesses. It seems last time the stuff was so dried out, warped and split to hell I just discounted it completely.
This poplar stock is quite green in spots. Does this disapear with finishing or is there a way to get it out. Perhaps a different supply is in order or go to maple, if it will hold still long enough to stay in the drawers.
Poplar is one of the most stable easy working, fine grained wood. It is what I would use. It also is easy to finish, and is closed grained, so it finishes slick and smooth, easily.
Basswood works almost as easy, and has good finishing grain also, but is a bit softer.
--
Jim in NC


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That's tulip poplar, aka the poplar of hardwood commerce. It MAY go brown if you leave it out in the sun, but it will be either green or brown in those green parts, unless perhaps you bleach it.
Cottonwood/ aspen/ the poplar (or popple) of the forest, no tulip attached, is dead white, but softer and prone to rot if it gets wet.
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Around these parts you can get Baltic Birch ply as thin as 1/8. Light colored and stable as it gets.
Dave in Houston
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Read his last sentence again.
"I thought about Baltic Birch but prefer not to have the stripes on the top edge for this".
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Go to Home Depot and buy an inexpensive 2" slat Venitian blind. Disassemble.
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NICE!!! THANX.
A friend and neighbour (fellow home builder) has old venetian blind slats he uses for everything. It's a running joke between us to use them for window shims and a tonne of other stuff. These are plastic though.
Anybody know what a good wood for drawers dividers is?I am looking for that white stuff that appears to be quite stable, must come in about 1/8" thickness. I thought about Baltic Birch but prefer not to have the stripes on the top edge for this. TIA
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On 1/9/11 10:30 AM, Leon wrote:

Idea on the month.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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Aside from many other decent suggestions (basically resaw from planks a lot) and along the same line as the "buy wooden venetian blinds for premade stock if you are looking for that and can't/won't resaw..."
Bandsaw is better for resawing, takes less space, and is less prone to the tablesaw-specific problems you are afraid of. Will still bite you if you are stupid around it, of course - anything that cuts wood cuts flesh. You can also resaw by hand (as usual with neander methods, much less space and money, but more practice is helpful, and things need to be sharp to work well.) I don't recall when, but at some point good old Tage Frid suggested the bandsaw as a more logical first power saw for a shop than the table saw. Someone with a FWW database/CDROM/DVD can probably find the article, unless it was in one of this books.
Depending what size you need - popsicle sticks, tongue depressors (both AKA craft sticks, and usually birch, I think), paint stirring sticks, yard sticks/rulers. The hobby shop route is possible but expensive. Up until the rulers and yardsitcjks, which used to be cheap but are less so these days, all of these are quite cheap sources of thin stock.
--
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Found a really nice possibility at the hardware / building supply store.
Finger jointed pine lattice slats sold as moldings. They come about 5/16" x 1.5", 2" and 3"
Of course they would need to be picked over to hide some of colour change joints for nicer drawer divider looks.
Anybody know what a good wood for drawers dividers is?
I am looking for that white stuff that appears to be quite stable, must come in about 1/8" thickness. I thought about Baltic Birch but prefer not to have the stripes on the top edge for this.
TIA
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