Drawer Bottoms 1/8" Hardboard + 1/8" Acrylic Coated MDF?

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I read a suggestion to use 1/8" Hardboard topped with 1/8" Acrylic Coated MDF for kitchen drawer bottoms.
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Unbranded-Thrifty-White-32-sq-ft-Hardboard-Panel-Board-709106/202090193
The theory is that the Acrylic Coated MDF looks good, is easy to clean and wouldn't need to be covered with shelving paper, etc.
Has anyone done this? If so, did you glue the panels together? If so, what type of glue works for hardboard and MDF?
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On Sunday, January 11, 2015 at 4:08:14 PM UTC-6, DerbyDad03 wrote:

*I like that "click for larger view".... like it would really make a difference!
I would think typical drawer bottoms (interiors) are adequate, just spray inside, when spraying the rest of the unit.
Sonny
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On 1/11/2015 4:08 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

If you glued the panels together they would be stronger. Past that if the white panel scratches it might look worse after a few years.
Plywood is always going to be stronger than hardboard. You might consider 1/4" paint grade plywood and paint it the color of choice with an enamel paint.
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On 1/11/15 5:07 PM, Leon wrote:

That's what I prefer. 1/8", even 3/16" feels cheap and sounds cheap. 1/4" ply feels strong, doesn't deflect, and makes much less noise when things are places on it.
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-MIKE-

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On Sunday, January 11, 2015 at 8:06:16 PM UTC-5, -MIKE- wrote:

Just FYI...there was never a plan to use just 1/8". I was asking about a lamination of 1/8" hardboard and 1/8" Acrylic Coated MDF, totaling 1/4".
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On 1/12/15 8:35 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Ok, gotcha. Still seems like more work. It's pretty easy to apply a finish to 1/4 plywood or better yet, use the pre-finished stuff. The finish they apply in the factory is very durable.
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On 1/12/2015 8:35 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

the same thickness, plywood.
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On Sunday, January 11, 2015 at 6:08:34 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

That's a good point. I may just go with the 1/4" ply and replaceable shelf liners/contact paper.

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Leon wrote:

"-MIKE-" wrote:

I'm with you.
1/4", 5 ply Birch die board and 2-3 coats of shellac works for me for drawer bottoms.
Lew
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Leon wrote:

"-MIKE-" wrote:

I'm with you.
1/4", 5 ply Birch die board and 2-3 coats of shellac works for me for drawer bottoms. --------------------------------------------------------------- Forgot to include that the shellac is a 1 lb cut applied with a 2" chip brush.
Lew
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On 1/11/2015 10:08 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

Certainly useable for epoxy glue ups.. not finishing.
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Jeff

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Lew Hodgett wrote:

"woodchucker" wrote:

After the first 500 or so, you develop a fondness as well as a user's technique for them.
Lew
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Yes. I have used it here and there in my shop, also in the house as tray bottoms (trays IN drawers).

No, I just used the 1/8" tileboard. Why do you want a lamination of it and hardboard?

Yellow glue. White glue. Plastic resin glue. Epoxy. IOW, any.
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On Monday, January 12, 2015 at 5:51:03 AM UTC-5, dadiOH wrote:

The lamination would be to achieve a 1/4" thickness for the actual drawer bottom, not for a drawer tray.

Thanks.

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Yeah, I understood that. The thing is, why? Although 1/4 is a pretty standard drawer bottom thickness, there is no rule requiring it. Some drawers need a bottom that thick, some need thicker but for most normally sized drawers 1/8 would be sufficient. (Unless you are going to store wrenches on them :).
Easy to cut the grooves for it too if your table saw blade is 1/8 or 1/8 + a RCH.
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On 1/12/2015 8:59 AM, dadiOH wrote:

Food for thought here, these will be kitchen drawers, kitchen utensils tend to be much like wrenches. ;~) I live in a relatively new neighborhood, newest homes are 3 years old. One of the builders used 1/8" thick drawer bottoms and I have rebuild several of those drawers, for neighbors, not mine, already. By comparison our builder used 1/4" bottoms and we have had no issues yet. 1/4" plywood is much less expensive than the time to rebuild a kitchen drawer bottom that may fail.
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On Monday, January 12, 2015 at 9:59:22 AM UTC-5, dadiOH wrote:

I'll be making 5 kitchen drawers. At this time, some could probably get by with 1/8" (plastic wrap/bags in one, a knife holder tray in another, etc.) However, at least one needs 1/4". Picture 2 trays full of utensils, one on top of the other (don't ask!).
Who knows...they are kitchen drawers today, maybe they'll be workshop drawers (read: wrenches) in the future. For consistency and longevity, I'll be using 1/4" bottoms.

My dado blade will get lonely.

A term I haven't heard since my Coast Guard days! Picture it said with a heavy German accent by a German national EE. Very funny, probably had to be there/know him. Sylt, Germany, circa 1974-75.

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On 1/12/2015 9:20 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

It should stay lonely if you use ply. I always use a standard 1/8" kerf blade, I use a flat cut blade for flat bottoms but not necessary. Get your bottom material first and make two passes on the TS to perfectly cut/fit your drawer bottom groove to the material you are going to use for the bottoms. If you use a dado it is very likely that it will cut too wide for 1/4" ply.
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On Monday, January 12, 2015 at 1:11:51 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

c.) However, at least one needs 1/4". Picture 2 trays full of utensils, one on top of the other (don't ask!).

be using 1/4" bottoms.

I'll keep that in mind. Certainly worth some testing. Thanks!
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On Sunday, January 11, 2015 at 2:08:14 PM UTC-8, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Drawer bottoms (in my silverware drawer, for instance) take a lot of steady load. I've seen a lot of MDF/hardboard/termitebarf movement in moisture/load situations, and would be happier with 3/8" plywood, rabbeted at the edges to fit a 1/4" groove.
For small drawers in dry locations, though, you could do well with melamine-surfaced hardboard (like for shower stalls).
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