DP spindle lock?

Hi.. I just got a drill press and the manual shows how to use the spindle lock, inserting a bolt into a threaded hole, but what is it supposed to lock and when are you suppose to use this?
Also is it a common practice to use a mallet to install the chuck, I wasn't sure how far the chuck should go into the tapered arbor, but I was afraid the hammering might increase the runout of the drill. Nothing is slipping so seems to be working for now.
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Does the spindle lock prevent the spindle from spinning? This would aid in the removal of the chuck.
Mine will lock to prevent up and down travel. Good for using a drum sander when you do not want to use the table adjustment.
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jeremy snipped-for-privacy@my-deja.com wrote:

The instructions for mine said to put a block of wood on the table and use the "press" action of the drill press to seat the chuck on the taper.
Chris
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jeremy snipped-for-privacy@my-deja.com wrote:

wood on the table. Use maybe 2-3 times the effort needed to pull the tab off a beverage can. That is; a single quick, firm, pull but not anything heroic.
DO make certain that both tapered surfaces (internal & external) are clean, smooth and very lightly oiled. Clean with mineral spirits, oil by wiping light weight oil on by hand and then wiping off again with a cloth or paper towel. We are not lubing the metal, we are sealing it. The oil will occupy the surface abrasions and all will be well.
Bill
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The splindle lock holds the spindle in place after it hase been extended by some arbitrary length. Not trying to sound smart, but when you need it you'll know! It's a very useful feature that is often not present on todays cheaper drill presses. Sounds as if the one you describe works like a set screw. The more traditional (and IMHO better) way is to have a split in the housing around the spindle and a clamp bolt arrangement that tightens the housing up around the spindle. I've seen set-screw style used to retrofit a drill press that did not have a factory spindle lock and it's certainly better than nothing.
Don'w worry about the mallet, that is the correct way to install the chuck. Just make sure the tapered surfaces inside and outside are clean and dry. One or 2 good whacks are usually all that is necessary
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Is the taper a morse taper or a jacobs taper?
Or... Is it 2" or less in length or longer? That will be enough to let us know.
If it is a Jacobs taper (short) then you want it clean and dry - NO OIL! Acetone to clean both the inside and outside surfaces is perfect but other thinners may work as long as they don't leave a residue. I exclusively use Acetone because it disappears fast. Set the chuck on the taper by hand then whack it with a soft mallet (leather, rubber, wood with a regular hammer, etc.) Hit straight on, not at an angle at all and you will be fine.
If it is a morse taper, clean surfaces the same way - NO OIL! Press the morse taper in by hand and then either give it a VERY gentle hit with a soft mallet or better yet, put a piece of wood on the table and use the arm to "press" it into the taper.
If it falls out during use, you didn't clean it well enough or hit it hard enough...
Make sure to open the chuck all the way in either case so that the jaws are retracted. You don't want to damage the chuck jaws at all.
Shoot me a private e-mail (anyone) and I'll email you a PDF with the basics for a Jacobs taper...
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Regards,
Joe Agro, Jr.
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Joe,
Some years ago Jacobs had chuck repair procedures on their website. Their instructions for a plain-bearing chuck (not bottom-end multicraft, not sure about the ball bearing chucks) were that the jaws be opened to approximately the half way point and that the _jaws_ rather than the sleeve be pressed or struck. The reasons being that the jaws are high strength hardened steel, much stronger than the sleeve and more importantly, the sleeve is simply press fit onto the chuck. If it is struck or used as the surface to press on, it is quite possible and even likely that it will move further back towards the end of the chuck with the taper. If it does move, the chuck key will no longer fit. If you disassemble one of these chucks for cleaning or repair it's easy to see how this can happen.
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plausible, and wrong." (Mencken)
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Ahh... I know what you mean. You are correct. The chucks we use are not built quite the same... But I do recall working with Jacobs chucks and they do indeed have a sleeve that presses off for rebuild / repair, etc.
Ours do also, but not in the same way.
Sorry to all for the potentially bad info.
Regards, Joe Agro, Jr. (800) 871-5022 01.908.542.0244 Automatic / Pneumatic Drills: http://www.AutoDrill.com Multiple Spindle Drills: http://www.Multi-Drill.com
V8013-R
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The spindle lock may actually be a "quill lock." Something that goes onto the quill in a "V" groove to make sure the quill does not rotate or move at all. When I sell multiple spindle heads to folks, a quill that rotates a bit can cause all types of problems when using wide heads... Imagine a 30" wide drilling head with chucks at both ends... If it is clamped to the Quill - and it is - and the quill moves 1 degree, that translates into lots of movement at the ends.
In wood, that might not be such a big issue because nobody I know uses a micrometer on wood... But in metalworking, .001" to .005" is a typical tolerance for location and/or hole size. ...That's thousanths of an inch for those of you who don't get it. <G> For you non-Americans... That.s roughly .0254mm
However... I think your device may keep the spindle extended to a set position for some other use - maybe a small sanding attachment, etc?
Regards, Joe Agro, Jr. (800) 871-5022 01.908.542.0244 Automatic / Pneumatic Drills: http://www.AutoDrill.com Multiple Spindle Drills: http://www.Multi-Drill.com
V8013-R
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