Double finishing/protection necessary?

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A couple of times I've seen Norm (genuflect) give a project a coat or two of finishing oil and THEN suggest that a couple coats of polyurethane on top of that wouldn't go amiss. Somehow that just doesn't seem very right, but I don't know why. Of course he tends to coat almost EVERYTHING with poly. I think he gets off on the vapors.
FoggyTown
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One of his heavy sponsors is PARKS, three guesses what they make. Dave
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Thinner, Thinner, Thinner?
I suspect he is using MinWax for the finishes.
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On Thu, 23 Nov 2006 13:50:57 +0000, Leon wrote:

Actually Parks is a division of Zinnser, which sells several polyurethane finishes under the "Parks" brand. But I doubt that that's why he uses it.
--
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woods that respond really well to BLO. Unfortunately BLO does almost nothing to protect the wood, so I will put pu over the oil.
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The oil is fine for a finish as long as you are very careful not to spill or scratch the surface. The poly is stronger protection.
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Quite often, oil can give a pleasing tone, with protection and some gloss added via a film finish.
A very common, classic finish on white oak is a rubbing with BLO, followed by sprayed nitrocellulose lacquer. Sitckley calls it "Limestone Oak."
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B A R R Y wrote:
> A very common, classic finish on white oak is a rubbing with BLO, > followed by sprayed nitrocellulose lacquer. Sitckley calls it > "Limestone Oak."
I stumbled into finishing white oak with BLO.
Very happy with results.
Rather than use something like poly, lacquer or shellac, used bees wax cut 1:1 with turps over the BLO.
IMHO, looks quite nice; however, piece is in a home occupied by adults and will not be exposed to tough duty.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Sorry - what's BLO? I know tung, danish, blends.
FoggyTown
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Boiled Linseed Oil
No need to be sorry . . . TLAs and ETLAs can take some getting used to; I know, I've worked for IBM thirty years . . . .
Don
--
"What do *you* care what other people think?" --Arline Feynman

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Don Fearn wrote:

TLAs? ETLAs? IBM? :)
FoggyTown
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TLA = Three Letter Acronym (like "IBM" ;^)
ETLA = Extended TLA, where three aren't enough.
In my years at IBM, I actually ran into nested TLAs where one or more of the letters stood for another TLA and sometimes the nesting went three levels. I can't think of any examples; this whole topic is making my brain hurt.
-Don
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: TLA = Three Letter Acronym (like "IBM" ;^)
: ETLA = Extended TLA, where three aren't enough.
: In my years at IBM, I actually ran into nested TLAs where one or more : of the letters stood for another TLA and sometimes the nesting went : three levels. I can't think of any examples; this whole topic is : making my brain hurt.
I'd be interested in seeing some of those.
There's also recursive acronyms, where one of the letters stands for the overall acronym, e.g., SAAB (Saab Automobile Aktiebolaget), and VISA (VISA International Service Association).
And there's a type I don't know the name of, but where one of the words represented in the acronym appears elsewhere in the overall term. ADAP (a chain of East Coast auto parts dealers) was originally American Discount Auto Parts, but was later renamed ADAp Discount Auto Parts.
    -- Andy Barss
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Andrew Barss (in ek5s8a$kp8$ snipped-for-privacy@onion.ccit.arizona.edu) said:
| And there's a type I don't know the name of, but where one | of the words represented in the acronym appears elsewhere in the | overall term. ADAP (a chain of East Coast auto parts | dealers) was originally American Discount Auto Parts, | but was later renamed ADAp Discount Auto Parts.
Linux is not unix :-)
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto
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Andrew Barss wrote:

GNU is Not Unix :-).
--
It's turtles, all the way down

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wrote:

It's cheap too, available at any hardware or paint store, and home centers, at ~ $5/qt or $11/gal. Do not be swayed by boutique brands of boiled linseed oil.
DO lay rags flat to dry, hang them in open air, or drop them in a bucket of water. This is the stuff your shop teacher warned you about when he mentioned "spontaneous combustion", and he wasn't kidding.
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Amen to that Barry! I had rubbed down a dried linseed finish with quad fine steel wool, blown it off & applied a thin final coat. I wrapped the steel wool pad in the cloth & left it to dry, thank goodness, on the outdoor cement patio. You guessed it in the morning there lied the blackened debris. The steel wool acting as a catalyst. BCinBC

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On Tue, 26 Dec 2006 13:52:51 -0600, Patriarch

I used to light it off with my Lionel train tracks. <G>
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Patriarch wrote:
> Well, the steel wool was actually a fuel, too. We used it frequently in > my younger days as a campfire starter, with a wooden match.
I avoid steel wool like it was the plague.
If you use it outside, you are almost guaranteed to have some of the residue turn into rust spots.
Much prefer either bronze wool of a 3M pot scrubber.
Lew
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