doors that don't warp

    I have been asked to make some cabinet door for use in a very humid climate. Which species of wood are least likely to warp?
        TIA
                    Peter
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wrote:

wood that has been stored and worked in *that* environment.
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Good point. And beyond that, Mahogany is a good choice when dimensional stability is a concern. What is their price range, though? Teak and mesquite are even more dimensionally stable than Mahogany, but usually at quite a relative premium.
Brian.
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Another suggeston.... Whatever species you choose.... laminate. In other words, if your doors are to be 3/4" thick, laminate two 3/8" thick pieces to get the 3/4" thickness.
Brian.

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Brian wrote:

Yahbut, there's a wee bit more to it than this. Say one piece of the samich wants to work against the other, the board may stay flat, but what if they were both prone to warp and twist in the same direction(s)? 'Sides, laminating 3/8" pieces in wider panels would be something of a toughie.
I would look hard at a quarter cut wood. Wood Bin has charts you can consult as do other Googled (key words: wood properties) sources.
http://www.woodbin.com/calcs/wdpick.htm
UA100
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other
to
Yeah, I don't know about twist in the same direction. But this is generally how its done on exterior doors for increased dimensional stability.
Brian.
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"peter" wrote in message

You will find that a combination of factors is best, Besides the wood type and moisture content, careful selection of whichever wood you decide upon will also help. Selecting wood where the grain is as vertical as possible on the ends (quarter sawn) will generally give you more stability.
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Last update: 5/15/04
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Whatever you use make sure that they get exactly the same finish inside and out.
Tim

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Good point. Also the first coat should probably be shellac. Shellac has excellent resistance to diffusion to water vapor and so will help prevent the formation of a moisture gradient in the wood, which can convert the simple dimensional change that all wood exhibits with changes in ambient humidity, to warpage.
Most finishes will go over DEWAXED shellac with few or any problems.
--

FF

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