Doors and Out of Plumb Walls

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That sounds like a good suggestion, -MIKE-. I plan on taking it.
Puckdropper
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Puckdropper wrote:

Like another guy reiterated, make sure you shim it or it will keep pulling.
That actually can come in handy. When I run across a door sticking in its jam, first thing I try is putting a long screw in the opposite hinge to see if it will pull back in line. Works a lot of the time.
Usually, if it were done to start, it would never had sagged.
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On 09 May 2009 04:48:29 GMT, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

I've seen the hinge screws come loose on jambs before, especially on particle board jambs. Probably stripped when they were manufactured. You can try to glue some toothpicks or something in the holes and try the screws again. If they still strip you can use some long utility screws and go into the trimmer stud. Either method might pull the door back toward the hinge side jamb enough to let it latch.
If not, and the clearances on the sides look okay but you see more gap at the header on the lock side than the hinge side you can take the trim off the hinge side (and maybe the two header pieces) and pry from the bottom to lift the hinge side jamb. This won't fix the out of plumb situation but it will let you put the trim back where it was (except for height) so you don't have to paint the walls again.
We had a pretty similar situation on a new house. We had trimmed the house and after about 6 months the builder called to tell us that there was a door that would no longer latch. I went over to fix it. The door was at the head of the stairs and sure enough the hinge side had dropped and the door wouldn't latch. I got out my levels and the door was still plumb but the header was no longer level. I re-set the door and told the builder that I thought that the floor was sagging on one side of the stairs. He didn't really think so but we got it fixed and all was okay. Within the next year we had repaired the same door in three different houses all of which were the same plan. On the last two you could see the cracks in the sheet rock running from the corner of the opening towards the ceiling. He finally believed me but it took him a while. After that they extended the stair wall in the basement to pick up one more floor truss. We never had to fix another one.
Mike O.
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Thanks for all the advice Mike. When I get a chance, I'll pull the trim off the hinge side and get a good idea what's there. Then I'll take your advice about replacing one screw per hinge with a 3" screw that goes through a shim.
The catch only misses by a small amount, so as long as the door is stable moving the catch plate would probably permanently solve the problem.
Puckdropper
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